cauterize


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cau·ter·ize

 (kô′tə-rīz′)
tr.v. cau·ter·ized, cau·ter·iz·ing, cau·ter·iz·es
1. To burn or sear with a cautery.
2. To deaden, as to feelings or moral scruples; callous.

[Middle English cauterizen, from Late Latin cautērizāre, to cauterize, brand, from Latin cautērium, cautery; see cautery.]

cau′ter·i·za′tion (-tər-ĭ-zā′shən) n.

cauterize

(ˈkɔːtəˌraɪz) or

cauterise

vb
(Surgery) (tr) (esp in the treatment of a wound) to burn or sear (body tissue) with a hot iron or caustic agent
[C14: from Old French cauteriser, from Late Latin cautērizāre, from cautērium branding iron, from Greek kautērion, from kaiein to burn]
ˌcauteriˈzation, ˌcauteriˈsation n

cau•ter•ize

(ˈkɔ təˌraɪz)

v.t. -ized, -iz•ing.
to burn with a hot iron, electric current, fire, or a caustic, esp. for curative purposes; treat with a cautery.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin cautērizāre to brand < Greek kautḗr branding iron (kau-, variant s. of kaíein to burn + -tēr agent suffix; compare caustic) + -izāre -ize]
cau`ter•i•za′tion, n.

cauterize


Past participle: cauterized
Gerund: cauterizing

Imperative
cauterize
cauterize
Present
I cauterize
you cauterize
he/she/it cauterizes
we cauterize
you cauterize
they cauterize
Preterite
I cauterized
you cauterized
he/she/it cauterized
we cauterized
you cauterized
they cauterized
Present Continuous
I am cauterizing
you are cauterizing
he/she/it is cauterizing
we are cauterizing
you are cauterizing
they are cauterizing
Present Perfect
I have cauterized
you have cauterized
he/she/it has cauterized
we have cauterized
you have cauterized
they have cauterized
Past Continuous
I was cauterizing
you were cauterizing
he/she/it was cauterizing
we were cauterizing
you were cauterizing
they were cauterizing
Past Perfect
I had cauterized
you had cauterized
he/she/it had cauterized
we had cauterized
you had cauterized
they had cauterized
Future
I will cauterize
you will cauterize
he/she/it will cauterize
we will cauterize
you will cauterize
they will cauterize
Future Perfect
I will have cauterized
you will have cauterized
he/she/it will have cauterized
we will have cauterized
you will have cauterized
they will have cauterized
Future Continuous
I will be cauterizing
you will be cauterizing
he/she/it will be cauterizing
we will be cauterizing
you will be cauterizing
they will be cauterizing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cauterizing
you have been cauterizing
he/she/it has been cauterizing
we have been cauterizing
you have been cauterizing
they have been cauterizing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cauterizing
you will have been cauterizing
he/she/it will have been cauterizing
we will have been cauterizing
you will have been cauterizing
they will have been cauterizing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cauterizing
you had been cauterizing
he/she/it had been cauterizing
we had been cauterizing
you had been cauterizing
they had been cauterizing
Conditional
I would cauterize
you would cauterize
he/she/it would cauterize
we would cauterize
you would cauterize
they would cauterize
Past Conditional
I would have cauterized
you would have cauterized
he/she/it would have cauterized
we would have cauterized
you would have cauterized
they would have cauterized
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.cauterize - burn, sear, or freeze (tissue) using a hot iron or electric current or a caustic agent; "The surgeon cauterized the wart"
care for, treat - provide treatment for; "The doctor treated my broken leg"; "The nurses cared for the bomb victims"; "The patient must be treated right away or she will die"; "Treat the infection with antibiotics"
2.cauterize - make insensitive or callous; deaden feelings or morals
inure, indurate, harden - cause to accept or become hardened to; habituate; "He was inured to the cold"
Translations
vypálit
ætseudbrænde
kauterisieren
polttaa
brenna fyrir
prideginti
piededzināt
dichtbrandendichtvriezentoebrandentoevriezen
vypáliť
dağlamakyakmak

cauterize

[ˈkɔːtəraɪz] VTcauterizar

cauterize

[ˈkɔːtəraɪz] cauterise (British) vt [+ wound] → cautériser

cauterize

vt (Med) → kauterisieren

cauterize

[ˈkɔːtəˌraɪz] vtcauterizzare

cauterize,

cauterise

(ˈkoːtəraiz) verb
to burn (a wound) with a caustic substance or a hot iron (to destroy infection).

cau·ter·ize

v. cauterizar, quemar por medio de un agente cauterizante.

cauterize

vt cauterizar
References in periodicals archive ?
In unipolar cauterization, a single insulated electrode is used to cauterize however in bipolar electric current flows between the two prongs of the bipolar probe.
Fans of the MTV TV series were left with their jaws on the ground as they watched the Lakewood psychopath hack off one of Branson's hands and then use an iron to cauterize the wound.
Two arms tipped with multiple tools can perforate gastric ulcers, cauterize and suture wounds, or perform emergency appendectomies.
If yours does cause you discomfort, it can easily be removed--your doctor or a dermatologist can snip it off with surgical scissors (this will cause minor bleeding), freeze it off with liquid nitrogen, or cauterize it.
Sulaiman Al-Habib Specialist Hospital has succeeded in helping five patients with chronic hypertension using second-generation devices to cauterize renal nerves via catheter.
MOSCOW: The bloodiest attack on Moscow in at least six years has confounded Russia s attempt to cauterize an Islamist insurgency spreading across the North Caucasus region.
Since the availability of the Bovie machine in the 1960s, surgeons have used electrosurgical devices in the OR to cauterize tissue and stop bleeding.
In the study, 167 patients were treated with either drugs to control their heartbeats or catheter ablation, in which doctors cauterize parts of the heart muscle causing erratic electrical signals.
And on the other side: Believing that he has become too much of a drag on his campaign, John McCain, the presumptive Republican presidential candidate, has stepped down -- the latest casualty of a presidential campaign eager to cauterize damage caused by its ties to lobbyists, age and President George W.
Girard's ideas on scapegoating reveal the tendency of religions to blame and execute victims to cauterize internal social strife; Miles underscores the power of metaphors as tools used by human groups to take revenge or to seek nonviolent means to resolve human conflicts; Wink's ideas on the "myth of redemptive violence," draws on the Babylonian story in which social order is created from an act of violence.
The government must immediately cauterize the financial wound killing the NHS.