cavalcade


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cav·al·cade

(kăv′əl-kād′, kăv′əl-kād′)
n.
1. A procession of riders or horse-drawn carriages.
2. A ceremonial procession or display.
3. A succession or series: starred in a cavalcade of Broadway hits.

[French, from Old French, from Old Italian cavalcata, from cavalcare, to ride on horseback, from Medieval Latin caballicāre, from Latin caballus, horse; see cavalier.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cavalcade

(ˌkævəlˈkeɪd)
n
1. a procession of people on horseback, in cars, etc
2. any procession: a cavalcade of guests.
[C16: from French, from Italian cavalcata, from cavalcare to ride on horseback, from Late Latin caballicāre, from caballus horse]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cav•al•cade

(ˌkæv əlˈkeɪd, ˈkæv əlˌkeɪd)

n.
1. a procession of persons riding on horses, in carriages or cars, etc.
2. any procession.
3. any noteworthy series, as of events or activities.
[1585–95; < Middle French < early Italian cavalcata horseback raid < Late Latin caballicāre]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cavalcade

 a procession of persons on horseback; a procession or parade of carriages.
Examples: cavalcade of carriages; of devils, 1709; of horsemen; of songs; of sewarry [Indian mounted troops], 1616.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cavalcade - a procession of people traveling on horseback
procession - the group action of a collection of people or animals or vehicles moving ahead in more or less regular formation; "processions were forbidden"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cavalcade

noun parade, train, procession, march-past a cavalcade of limousines and police motorcycles
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مَوْكِبُ عَرَباتٍ فُرسان)
kavalkádaprůvod
procession
lovas felvonulás
skrúîfylking
kavalkada
kavalkāde
kavalkáda
gösterişli geçit

cavalcade

[ˌkævəlˈkeɪd] Ncabalgata f (fig) → desfile m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cavalcade

[ˌkævəlˈkeɪd] n [cars, carriages, horses] → cortège m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cavalcade

nKavalkade f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cavalcade

[ˌkævəlˈkeɪd] n (of horses, cars) → sfilata
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cavalcade

(kӕvəlˈkeid) noun
a ceremonial procession.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Presently there was a distant blare of military music; it came nearer, still nearer, and soon a noble cavalcade wound into view, glorious with plumed helmets and flashing mail and flaunting banners and rich doublets and horse-cloths and gilded spear- heads; and through the muck and swine, and naked brats, and joyous dogs, and shabby huts, it took its gallant way, and in its wake we followed.
"But does your foolish old hen suppose that this entire cavalcade, which is bound on an important adventure, is going to stand still while she lays her egg?" enquired the Tin Woodman, earnestly.
Sir Richard was advised of the cavalcade's approach, and quickly recognized his royal master in the tall knight who rode in advance.
As the cavalcade took up the line of march in single file, Sola dragged me into an empty chariot and we proceeded with the procession toward the point by which I had entered the city the day before.
Towards the middle of the month of May, in the year 1660, at nine o'clock in the morning, when the sun, already high in the heavens, was fast absorbing the dew from the ramparts of the castle of Blois a little cavalcade, composed of three men and two pages, re-entered the city by the bridge, without producing any other effect upon the passengers of the quay beyond a first movement of the hand to the head, as a salute, and a second movement of the tongue to express, in the purest French then spoken in France: "There is Monsieur returning from hunting." And that was all.
"And now we're really off for Copan!" exclaimed Professor Bumper one morning, when the cavalcade, led by Tolpec in the capacity of head guide, started off.
He had but four men remaining with him, and forty-six horses to take care of; with these he had to make his way over mountain and plain, through a marauding, horse-stealing region, full of peril for a numerous cavalcade so slightly manned.
The major's first feeling was that of satisfaction in having left his cavalcade behind; if this were an enemy and should escape he would have little to report.
Magnificent preparations were made to receive the illustrious statesman; a cavalcade of horsemen set forth to meet him at the boundary line of the State, and all the people left their business and gathered along the wayside to see him pass.
Early the following morning a gay cavalcade set out to visit the famous Sorceress, Glinda the Good.
The two soldiers mounted motor-cycles and the little cavalcade turned away.
Another lay brother led a sumpter mule, loaded probably with his superior's baggage; and two monks of his own order, of inferior station, rode together in the rear, laughing and conversing with each other, without taking much notice of the other members of the cavalcade.