cave-in


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cave-in

(kāv′ĭn′)
n.
1.
a. A collapse, as of a tunnel or structure.
b. A place where a cave-in has occurred.
2. An act or instance of ceasing opposition or resistance: The vote was seen as a cave-in to the demands of the administration.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cave′-in`



n.
1. a collapse, as of anything hollow.
2. a site of such a collapse.
3. surrender or yielding to another.
[1700–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

cave-in

[ˈkeɪvɪn] N [of roof etc] → derrumbe m, derrumbamiento m; [of pavement etc] → socavón m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cave-in

[ˈkeɪvˌɪn] ncrollo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2016, eight miners were killed in a cave-in at the Rudna mine in Polkowice and methane explosions killed five miners at the Myslowice-Wesola mine in 2014.
Most such accidental deaths and injuries are blamed on unprofessional digging, use of substandard equipment, explosions inside coalmines, cave-in and fumes.
5 cave-in that trapped 33 miners deep underground in a small gold and copper mine in the far north of Chile.
COPIAPO Chile, August 23, 2010 (TAP) - Rescue workers on Monday reinforced a small drill hole to serve as an umbilical cord to 33 miners found alive 17 days after a cave-in in Chile's far north and say it will take months to dig them out.
The workers were trapped at a depth of 540 metres when the powerful explosion, triggered by a build-up of methane gas, caused a massive cave-in.
The greatest hazard and the most feared is a cave-in. As noted in a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), the Bureau of Labor Statistics documented that 75 percent (or 411) of the 542 excavation-and-trenching fatalities studied in the United States from 1991 to 2001 were the result of a cave-in.
Also, they must be braced against each other to prevent lateral movement in the event of a cave-in. Similarly, the shield width should match the trench width, also to minimize the risk of cave-in.
Excavation/trenching cave-in (041) 411 Struck by object (02) 35 Pedestrian struck by vehicle/equipment (43) 19 Caught in or compressed by equipment/objects (03) 14 All other events 63 Total 542 Event (OIICS * code) (%) Excavation/trenching cave-in (041) (75.8) Struck by object (02) (6.5) Pedestrian struck by vehicle/equipment (43) (3.5) Caught in or compressed by equipment/objects (03) (2.6) All other events (11.6) Total (100.0) Source: Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (excludes New York City).
The pillars are stripped during the retreat portion of the process, resulting in what Zipf calls a "controlled cave-in." The long wall approach begins by developing two parallel gate roads approximately 750 feet apart.
Recently in two separate accidents of gas explosion and cave-in, at least 23 coal miners lost their lives in Balochistan's coalfields.
OSHA announced last week that it plans to levy $84,000 in fines to Accadia Site Contracting Inc., for their "cave-in hazard" at Lewiston Road work site claiming "willful and serious excavation safety violations."
Also in the northwest, 19 workers lost their lives in a cave-in set off by an explosion in a mine in December.