cavefish


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cave·fish

 (kāv′fĭsh′)
n. pl. cavefish or cave·fish·es
Any of various North American freshwater fishes of the family Amblyopsidae, found in subterranean waters and having rudimentary nonfunctioning eyes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cavefish

(ˈkeɪvˌfɪʃ)
n, pl -fish or -fishes
(Animals) any of various small freshwater cyprinodont fishes of the genera Amblyopsis, Chologaster, etc, living in subterranean and other waters in S North America. See also blindfish
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The New Jersey Institute of Technology is part of a new research collaboration funded by a National Science Foundation grant of $997,510 to study the pelvic structure and walking mechanics of blind cavefish.The New Jersey Institute of Technology is part of a new research collaboration funded by a National Science Foundation grant of $997,510 to study the pelvic structure and walking mechanics of blind cavefish.
FINALLY a burst of marvellous sunshine, so time to get the garden furniture out and get a great big dose of vitamin D while changing my body hue from a slightly translucent pale cavefish - a Farrow & Ball colour, I think - to a normal(ish) pinky colour.
Vallone et al., "A blind circadian clock in cavefish reveals that opsins mediate peripheral clock photoreception," PLoS Biology, vol.
In March, another group of scientists discovered Cryptotora thamicola, a type of waterfall cavefish, in Thailand.
Borowsky, "The Population Genomics of Repeated Evolution in the Blind Cavefish Astyanax mexicanus," Molecular Biology and Evolution 30, no.
This percentage supports the idea that energy cost-cutting helps explain how cavefish go blind.
Some complex systems do indeed run afoul of energy flows outside their optimality ranges, thereby devolving to simpler status of which there are many examples in Nature, and not just in biology; for example, white dwarf stars become homogenized near termination, cavefish lose their eyesight while retreating to darker niches, and cities go bankrupt while unable to manage sufficient energy flows for their residents.
For instance, surface-dwelling progenitors of cavefish harbour cryptic genetic variation for eye size.
In this week's edition of the journal Science, a team of researchers from Harvard Medical School and Whitehead Institute report that, at least in the case of one variety of cavefish, that other agent of change is the heat shock protein known as HSP90.
Despite the toxic conditions, the cave harbors a diverse fauna of terrestrial and aquatic organisms (Summers Engel, 2007), including a unique population of cavefish (cave mollies, Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae).