cavelike

cavelike

(ˈkeɪvˌlaɪk)
adj
similar to or resembling a cave
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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His design features a dramatic curve made up of thousands of shards of grey slate, creating a cavelike space for Londoners to enjoy a picnic.
Apart from a few aluminum-foil stalactites, it is not particularly cavelike. A collage of mass-media ephemera--postcards of masterpieces, newspaper photographs, posters of horses--pin it to the present.
The cavelike depths of the subconscious, dark and damp, where supposedly nothing lives--but where "nothing" sure makes a racket.
Staged in a cavelike space, the happening allowed visitors to pick fruit dangled from the ceiling, harvest carbs from bread-stuffed logs, and receive boiled potatoes from a man who repeated "Get 'em." That same year, Carolee Schneemann filmed eight semi-nude performers as they rolled together with raw chicken and sausage in fits of Dionysian ecstasy, in "Meat Joy." In food performance, elements of the artwork physically interact with the participant through multiple senses.
Cavelike spaces formed in bedrock B as the sugar cubes dissolved.
Another regaled me with tales of long evenings spent solving the world's problems over an endless succession of tender kebabs in one of the legendary restaurant's cavelike private rooms.
Thus it tends to break out of the cavelike perspective of pleonexia, which comes into focus as self-enclosed, dark, narrow, and sad.
The local high school is populated with a weird student body and even stranger teachers in a cavelike labyrinthine building.
But, more adventurous than Glazebrook, she then struck out first to Zelve and then to the underground city at Derinkuyu, where she reported that "the cavelike 'city' demands silence, the silence of wonder and not a little controlled fear." When her guide leaves her to rescue a panicking Frenchwoman she felt her own panic "rise like a temperature," although she managed to rein it in enough to continue to the lowest level.
Yet in the same novel, God communicates with her husband, the unfallen King, through a divine artifice, taking him deep below the earth to a cavelike theater and "showing [him] in a darkness what was happening to the Queen," thereby prompting him toward a secret moral choice regarding her (225).