celebutante


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celebutante

a celebrity who is well known in fashionable society; a blend of celebrity and debutante

ce·leb·u·tante

 (sə-lĕb′yə-tänt′)
n.
A young, fashionable, and usually wealthy person who is the subject of frequent media attention.

[Blend of celebrity and debutante.]

celebutante

(sɪˈlɛbjʊˌtɑːnt; -ˌtænt)
n
a young woman from a wealthy background who becomes a celebrity
[C20: from celeb(rity) + (deb)utante]

ce•leb•u•tante

(səˈlɛb yʊˌtɑnt)
n.
a person seeking the limelight by associating with celebrities.
[1985–90; b. celebrity and debutante]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The 37-year-old TV personality and celebutante was delighted to present her 24th perfume Platinum Rush in co-operation with Al Hawaj Group.
Ocean's 8 - Anne Hathaway plays a celebutante planning to
Also doing a strip was celebutante Amanda Lepore, who also along with Moan and Chachki performed Diamonds Are A Girl's Best Friend.
After serving ten years in jail for murdering her wealthy socialite mother, celebutante Janie Jenkins is released on a technicality.
The former Baywatch star, who filed for divorce in July, was seen canoodling the 46-year-old celebutante in Sardinia recently, Us magazine reported.
The celebutante had no experience before being hired to co-host the high-profile Fox singing competition.
Sparkling with the multi-faceted glamour of a pink diamond, Dazzle is the newest fragrance from the "celebutante." As brilliant and feminine as a coveted gem, this fruity floral alluringly expresses Paris' whimsical side, revealing her inner beauty--dazzlingly and charming without the need for bling, according to Parlux.
Hearst, 28, has never been the kind of airhead heiress or celebutante who gets in trouble.
While lipstick imperialism argues that women worldwide are passively endorsing the celebutante look, lipstick jihad highlights another possible use of the much-decried western model of femininity.
You're standing in the checkout line at the grocery story, half-heartedly gazing at all the vacuous gossip magazine covers that proclaim the latest reality show stars' divorces or the most recent travails of that Hollywood celebutante who seems to be in constant transit between rehab and jail, when you think longingly to yourself, "If only I had access to the latest issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter right now."