celibate

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Related to celibates: celibacy

celibate

a person who abstains from having sex: She has chosen to be celibate until marriage.; a person who remains unmarried for religious reasons: The priests have vowed to remain celibate.
Not to be confused with:
celebrate – to commemorate with festivities: celebrate a birthday; honor, laud, applaud: celebrate a victory

cel·i·bate

 (sĕl′ə-bĭt)
adj.
1. Abstaining from sexual relations.
2. Remaining unmarried, as for religious reasons.
n.
1. One who abstains from sexual relations.
2. One who remains unmarried, as for religious reasons.

[Latin caelibātus, from caelebs, caelib-, unmarried.]

celibate

(ˈsɛlɪbɪt)
n
a person who is unmarried, esp one who has taken a religious vow of chastity
adj
1. unmarried, esp by vow
2. abstaining from sexual intercourse
[C17: from Latin caelibātus, from caelebs unmarried, of obscure origin]
ˈcelibacy n

cel•i•bate

(ˈsɛl ə bɪt, -ˌbeɪt)

n.
1. a person who abstains from sexual relations.
2. a person who remains unmarried, esp. for religious reasons.
adj.
3. observing or pertaining to sexual abstention or a religious vow not to marry.
4. not married.
[1820–30; derivative of celibacy, by analogy with obstinacy: obstinate, etc.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.celibate - an unmarried person who has taken a religious vow of chastity
religious person - a person who manifests devotion to a deity
Adj.1.celibate - abstaining from sexual intercourse; "celibate priests"
chaste - morally pure (especially not having experienced sexual intercourse); "a holy woman innocent and chaste"

celibate

adjective chaste, single, pure, virgin, continent He found it hard to adapt to the celibate life of a monk.
Translations
أعْزب، عازِب
celibátní
i cølibat
fraŭlo
agglegényhajadonnőtlenszüzességi fogadalmat tett
einlífis-, skírlífis-
celibátcelibátny
evlenmemeye yemin etmiş

celibate

[ˈselɪbɪt]
A. ADJcélibe
B. Ncélibe mf

celibate

[ˈsɛlɪbət]
adj
[life, priest] → célibataire
to remain celibate → rester célibataire
[lay person] → chaste
npersonne f qui n'a pas de rapports sexuels

celibate

adj (Rel) → keusch, zölibatär (spec); (fig)enthaltsam
n to be a celibateim Zölibat leben

celibate

[ˈsɛlɪbɪt] adj & n (man) → celibe (m); (woman) → nubile (f)

celibacy

(ˈselibəsi) noun
the state of being unmarried or of refraining from sexual intercourse, especially in obedience to religious vows.
ˈcelibate (-bət) adjective

celibate

adj célibe, que no tiene relaciones sexuales
References in classic literature ?
They are a company of celibates, grinding harshly against one another and growing daily more calloused from the grinding.
The labor was performed by convicts, prisoners of war, delinquent debtors and confirmed bachelors who were too poor to pay the high celibate tax which all red-Martian governments impose.
Whatever the reason, Ferrier remained strictly celibate. In every other respect he conformed to the religion of the young settlement, and gained the name of being an orthodox and straight-walking man.
We do not present the chevalier as an accomplished man; but surely we can pardon, in an old celibate whose heart sends so much blood to his left cheek, these adorable qualities, founded, perhaps, on some sublime secret history.
You won't give it me, you little celibate simpleton.
"Oh, by being a celibate simpleton, I suppose," he said.
The detachment of a professional celibate seemed to reveal to the others that they stood round the woman as a ring of amorous rivals; just as a stranger coming in with frost on his coat will reveal that a room is like a furnace.
Out of the chosen 85 scholars, 50 are Brahmachari (male celibates) and 35 Brahmacharinis (female celibates).
Now it is an indisputable fact that God calls married men to the priesthood as well as celibates. This knowledge is based on the New Testament witness (Mk 1:30; 1 Cor 9:5; 1 Tim 3:2, 12) and in the uninterrupted tradition of some of the eastern churches, including the Catholic ones, as well as on the dispensations granted by popes to converted married clergy in the West since the time of Pius XII.
tackles the stressors that fall upon all celibates at one time or another and follows up with realistic coping strategies.
Jesuit Fr Gerdenio "Sonny" Manuel has written an important book for current and next-generation priests facing the challenges of ministerial effectiveness and personal well-being as celibates. His book is a clear sign of how far we have come from the days when newly ordained priests chose for their ordination cards the famous 19th-century prayer of French priest and orator Jean-Baptiste Henri Lacordaire that spoke of priests as otherworldly and heroic men with "a heart of bronze."
Catholic Workers forge family ties with the poor by sharing their lives; the communities of L'Arche create households of developmentally disabled people and their "assistants." The growing church movements often gather as one family married couples, single people, and vowed celibates.