celt


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Celt

 (kĕlt, sĕlt) also Kelt (kĕlt)
n.
1. One of an Indo-European people originally of central Europe and spreading to western Europe, the British Isles, and southeast to Galatia during pre-Roman times, especially a Briton or Gaul.
2. A native speaker of a modern Celtic language or a descendant of such a speaker, especially a modern Gael, Welsh person, Cornish person, or Breton.

[French Celte, sing. of Celtes, Celts, from Latin Celtae, from Greek Keltoi.]

celt

 (sĕlt)
n.
A common prehistoric tool of stone or metal, shaped like a chisel or axe head.

[Medieval Latin celtis, chisel probably back-formed from celte, a word found in some manuscripts of the Vulgate (Job 14:24) and interpreted as the ablative of a Latin *celtis, chisel, but probably a misreading of Latin certē, certainly.]

celt

(sɛlt)
n
(Archaeology) archaeol a stone or metal axelike instrument with a bevelled edge
[C18: from Late Latin celtes chisel, of obscure origin]

Celt

(kɛlt; sɛlt) or

Kelt

n
1. (Languages) a person who speaks a Celtic language
2. (Peoples) a person who speaks a Celtic language
3. (Peoples) a member of an Indo-European people who in pre-Roman times inhabited Britain, Gaul, Spain, and other parts of W and central Europe

celt

(sɛlt)

n.
a prehistoric ax of stone or metal without perforations or grooves, for hafting.
[1705–15; < Late Latin *celtis chisel]

Celt

(kɛlt, sɛlt)

also Kelt



n.
1. a member of any of a group of Indo-European peoples inhabiting the British Isles and large areas of W and central Europe in antiquity.
2. a member of any of several modern peoples descended from the ancient Celts and speaking Celtic languages, including the Irish, Scots of the Scottish Highlands and Hebrides, Welsh, and Bretons.
[1695–1705; < Latin Celtae (pl.) < Greek Keltoí]

celt

A prehistoric stone or metal implement shaped like an ax head.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.celt - a member of a European people who once occupied Britain and Spain and Gaul prior to Roman timesCelt - a member of a European people who once occupied Britain and Spain and Gaul prior to Roman times
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Gael - a Gaelic-speaking Celt in Ireland or Scotland or the Isle of Man
Briton - an inhabitant of southern Britain prior to the Anglo-Saxon invasions
Gaul - a Celt of ancient Gaul
Translations
Kelt
KelteKeltin
KeltKeltkinja
kelta
Celt

Celt

[kelt, selt] Ncelta mf

Celt

[ˈkɛlt] nCelte mf

Celt

nKelte m, → Keltin f

Celt

[kɛlt, sɛlt] ncelta m/f
References in classic literature ?
The Celt in all his variants from Builth to Ballyhoo, His mental processes are plain--one knows what he will do, And can logically predicate his finish by his start: But the English--ah, the English!--they are quite a race apart.
And while the Celt is talking from Valencia to Kirkwall, The English--ah, the English!--don't say anything at all!
"A glance at our friend here reveals the rounded head of the Celt, which carries inside it the Celtic enthusiasm and power of attachment.
In other ways after my father, the blue-eyed Celt with the fairy song on his tongue and the restless feet that stole the rest of him away to far-wandering.
It is now many years that men have resorted to the forest for fuel and the materials of the arts: the New Englander and the New Hollander, the Parisian and the Celt, the farmer and Robin Hood, Goody Blake and Harry Gill; in most parts of the world the prince and the peasant, the scholar and the savage, equally require still a few sticks from the forest to warm them and cook their food.
But the coal-black Celt with the second-sight did not see fit to reply till he had tapped Dan on the shoulder, and for the twentieth time croaked the old, old prophecy in his ear:
It will be simplest for us to call them all Celts and to divide them into two families, the Gaels and the Cymry.
It strikes me, however, that among your Australian friends may be someone who wishes to make a settlement in the Old Country, and would care to fix the spot in one of the most historic regions in England, full of romance and legend, and with a never-ending vista of historical interest--an estate which, though small, is in perfect condition and with illimitable possibilities of development, and many doubtful--or unsettled-- rights which have existed before the time of the Romans or even Celts, who were the original possessors.
So that in such a state riches will necessarily be in general esteem, particularly if the men are governed by their wives, which has been the case with many a brave and warlike people except the Celts, and those other nations, if there are any such, who openly practise pederasty.
We find the "standing stones" of the Celts in Asian Siberia; in the pampas of America.
There is no stronger case than that of the wild, unworldly and perishing stock which we commonly call the Celts, of whom your friends the MacNabs are specimens.
Celt was an early pioneer of the craft beer scene in the UK, making hoppy, extravagant beers that were brewed using continental hops, rich malt body and often foraged raw materials.