cemetery


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cem·e·ter·y

 (sĕm′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
n. pl. cem·e·ter·ies
A place for burying the dead; a graveyard.

[Middle English cimiterie, from Old French cimitiere, from Medieval Latin cimitērium, from Late Latin coemētērium, from Greek koimētērion, from koimān, to put to sleep; see kei- in Indo-European roots.]

cemetery

(ˈsɛmɪtrɪ)
n, pl -teries
a place where the dead are buried, esp one not attached to a church
[C14: from Late Latin coemētērium, from Greek koimētērion room for sleeping, from koiman to put to sleep]

cem•e•ter•y

(ˈsɛm ɪˌtɛr i)

n., pl. -ter•ies.
a burial ground for the dead.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin coemētērium < Greek koimētḗrion a sleeping place <koimân to put to sleep]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cemetery - a tract of land used for burialscemetery - a tract of land used for burials  
potter's field - a cemetery for unknown or indigent people
land site, site - the piece of land on which something is located (or is to be located); "a good site for the school"

cemetery

noun graveyard, churchyard, burial ground, necropolis, God's acre There was a small cemetery just outside the town.
Translations
مَقْبَرَةمَقْبَرَه
hřbitov
kirkegårdbegravelsesplads
hautausmaahautuumaakalmisto
groblje
temető
kirkjugarîur, grafreitur
墓地
묘지
coemeterium
kapinės
kapsēta
pokopališče
kyrkogård
สุสาน
nghĩa trangnghĩa địa

cemetery

[ˈsemɪtrɪ] Ncementerio m

cemetery

[ˈsɛmətəri] ncimetière m

cemetery

nFriedhof m

cemetery

[ˈsɛmɪtrɪ] ncimitero, camposanto

cemetery

(ˈsemətri) , ((American) -teri) plural ˈcemeteries noun
a piece of ground, usually not round a church, where people are buried.

cemetery

مَقْبَرَة hřbitov kirkegård Friedhof νεκροταφείο cementerio hautausmaa cimetière groblje cimitero 墓地 묘지 begraafplaats kirkegård cmentarz cemitério кладбище kyrkogård สุสาน mezarlık nghĩa trang 公墓
References in classic literature ?
These brief, stammering illuminations brought out with ghastly distinctness the monuments and headstones of the cemetery and seemed to set them dancing.
Twelve years had passed since I had laid the body of my great-uncle, Captain John Carter, of Virginia, away from the sight of men in that strange mausoleum in the old cemetery at Richmond.
If they took him to the cemetery and laid him in a grave, he would allow himself to be covered with earth, and then, as it was night, the grave-diggers could scarcely have turned their backs before he would have worked his way through the yielding soil and escaped.
As they journeyed, they passed through a cemetery full of monuments.
The remains of Henrietta Trefusis were interred in Highgate Cemetery the day before Christmas Eve.
This glade was a cemetery, this hole a tomb, this oblong object the body of the man who had died in the night
At last he and Albert Price followed the hearse to the cemetery at Montparnasse.
The founders of a new colony, whatever Utopia of human virtue and happiness they might originally project, have invariably recognised it among their earliest practical necessities to allot a portion of the virgin soil as a cemetery, and another portion as the site of a prison.
But on hearing that he had not slept at home I was much alarmed, and hastened to the cemetery, where, unluckily, the tombs were all so alike that I could not discover which was the one I was in search of, though I spent four days in looking for it.
They showed us a miniature cemetery there--a copy of the first graveyard that was ever in Marseilles, no doubt.
Dirk and I alone followed the hearse to the cemetery.
In spite of their grief, the crowd was so silent that you could hear the sound of the bell during mass and the chanting as far as the end of the High Street; but when the procession started again for the new cemetery, which M.