censorious

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cen·so·ri·ous

 (sĕn-sôr′ē-əs)
adj.
1. Tending to censure; critical.
2. Expressing censure.

[Latin cēnsōrius, of a censor, from cēnsor, Roman censor; see censor.]

cen·so′ri·ous·ly adv.
cen·so′ri·ous·ness n.

censorious

(sɛnˈsɔːrɪəs)
adj
harshly critical; fault-finding
cenˈsoriously adv
cenˈsoriousness n

cen•so•ri•ous

(sɛnˈsɔr i əs, -ˈsoʊr-)

adj.
severely critical; faultfinding; carping.
[1530–40; < Latin cēnsōrius of a censor; see censor, -tory1, -ous]
cen•so′ri•ous•ly, adv.
cen•so′ri•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.censorious - harshly critical or expressing censure; "was censorious of petty failings"
critical - marked by a tendency to find and call attention to errors and flaws; "a critical attitude"

censorious

adjective critical, severe, carping, disapproving, scathing, disparaging, judgmental, cavilling, condemnatory, fault-finding, captious He is too judgmental and censorious for my liking.

censorious

adjective
Inclined to judge too severely:
Translations
قاسٍ في نَقْدِهِ
kritickýodsuzující
fordømmendekritisk
bírál ó
gagnrÿninn, dómharîur
eleştirici/tenkitçi

censorious

[senˈsɔːrɪəs] ADJ (frm) → hipercrítico

censorious

[sɛnˈsɔːrɪəs] adj (formal) (= critical) → sévère

censorious

adj remark, glancestrafend; he was very censorious of the new policyer kritisierte die neue Politik scharf

censorious

[ˌsɛnˈsɔːrɪəs] adjcritico/a

censor

(ˈsensə) noun
1. an official who examines films etc and has the power to remove any of the contents which might offend people. Part of his film has been banned by the censor.
2. an official (eg in the army) who examines letters etc and removes information which the authorities do not wish to be made public for political reasons etc.
verb
This film has been censored; The soldiers' letters are censored.
cenˈsorious (-ˈsoː-) adjective
very critical. She is censorious about the behaviour of young people.
ˈcensorship noun
the policy of censoring. Some people disapprove of censorship.
References in periodicals archive ?
Censoriously asserting one's moral superiority and treating skeptics as imbeciles and deplorables wins few converts.
Without a trace of tendentiousness, free of all doctrine, the biographer seeks to understand the strange behavior of his subject through telling the story of his life without commenting censoriously on it.
Prior to his appearance, however, Belforest introduces his "precise" manner of speaking, as he responds censoriously to Charlemont's polite two-line reply: "Accompliments are more for ornament / Than use.
Thus, Franzen's third and highly successful novel, The Corrections (2001), was rather censoriously analysed by Annesley (2006) from a political point of view.
But it can be uncomfortable to watch, and the new film takes an opposite tack, looking censoriously at both the young British crowd that includes the heroine Iris ("That horrible rabble,'' they're called) and the older travelers on the train who initially refuse to believe her.
In both her journalism and her fiction she depicted various religious practices, often censoriously.
Moreover, in the context of what Gurharpal Singh has described as the voyeuristic mainstream "penchant for titillating tales" of ethnic minority life, it is necessary to exercise critical caution toward a less-than-outstanding work that exposes black and Asian communities to this gaze, whether politely relativist or censoriously Eurocentric.
While her explanation of how she confuses the word "felon" for "fellow" because of its archaic spelling is persuasive, the passage is another example of Hawthorne's repeated assessment of the landscape and artifacts she sees through a clearly American lens, which, in this case, censoriously invests the English queen with callous cruelty.
IMAGINE A PECULIAR, ERSATZ VERSION of the censoriously right-wing British newspaper the Daily Mail: Alongside pedestrian stories on pension funds and gossip items about Jude Law, one finds conspicuously incongruous features on Edouard Manet's lesbian muse and cross-dressing in colonial America.
In this regard, we might note here the class inscriptions of reproductive "excess": the "demure" silence and/or secrecy surrounding the pregnancies of stars such as Angelina Jolie or Nicole Kidman (or the cloaked early life of baby Suri Cruise) contrasts with the media visibility of Britney Spears' pregnant body, her woeful parenting "efforts", or the open speculation surrounding her reproductive state (as she was filmed purchasing a pregnancy test in a chain drugstore the public was cued to wonder censoriously is she pregnant "again"?