censorious

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cen·so·ri·ous

 (sĕn-sôr′ē-əs)
adj.
1. Tending to censure; critical.
2. Expressing censure.

[Latin cēnsōrius, of a censor, from cēnsor, Roman censor; see censor.]

cen·so′ri·ous·ly adv.
cen·so′ri·ous·ness n.

censorious

(sɛnˈsɔːrɪəs)
adj
harshly critical; fault-finding
cenˈsoriously adv
cenˈsoriousness n

cen•so•ri•ous

(sɛnˈsɔr i əs, -ˈsoʊr-)

adj.
severely critical; faultfinding; carping.
[1530–40; < Latin cēnsōrius of a censor; see censor, -tory1, -ous]
cen•so′ri•ous•ly, adv.
cen•so′ri•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.censorious - harshly critical or expressing censure; "was censorious of petty failings"
critical - marked by a tendency to find and call attention to errors and flaws; "a critical attitude"

censorious

adjective critical, severe, carping, disapproving, scathing, disparaging, judgmental, cavilling, condemnatory, fault-finding, captious He is too judgmental and censorious for my liking.

censorious

adjective
Inclined to judge too severely:
Translations
قاسٍ في نَقْدِهِ
kritickýodsuzující
fordømmendekritisk
bírál ó
gagnrÿninn, dómharîur
eleştirici/tenkitçi

censorious

[senˈsɔːrɪəs] ADJ (frm) → hipercrítico

censorious

[sɛnˈsɔːrɪəs] adj (formal) (= critical) → sévère

censorious

adj remark, glancestrafend; he was very censorious of the new policyer kritisierte die neue Politik scharf

censorious

[ˌsɛnˈsɔːrɪəs] adjcritico/a

censor

(ˈsensə) noun
1. an official who examines films etc and has the power to remove any of the contents which might offend people. Part of his film has been banned by the censor.
2. an official (eg in the army) who examines letters etc and removes information which the authorities do not wish to be made public for political reasons etc.
verb
This film has been censored; The soldiers' letters are censored.
cenˈsorious (-ˈsoː-) adjective
very critical. She is censorious about the behaviour of young people.
ˈcensorship noun
the policy of censoring. Some people disapprove of censorship.
References in periodicals archive ?
William Rice offers what could be a tantalizing set of situational analogues in Ralph Ellison and the Politics of the Novel (2003), but his censoriousness replaces close reading and the curiosity affection for literature generates.
In the '60s, the music group called The Fifth Dimension could indeed sing of "mystic crystal revelations, and the mind's true liberations," but in the 20teens it would take a fifth dimension indeed, or perhaps an alternate universe, for genuine liberation of the mind amid all that smug conformity and self-congratulatory censoriousness.
Christmas brings out in droves, like hives, all the control freaks and lifestyle commandants who, in a periodic fit of censoriousness, want to create a totalitarian winterwonderland state where they reign like modernday Caesars.
and, on the other, their censoriousness, manifested in political correctness that anathematizes an ever-expanding list of expressions deemed harmful or hateful.
As Henry Chadwick writes, "Sanctity could easily merge into separation and censoriousness.
What we are up against here is not only a question of whether certain kinds of ideas and positions can be permitted in public space, but how public space is itself defined by certain kinds of exclusions, emerging patterns of censoriousness and censorship" (PL, 126).
its cause by the same means we judge and we shall in no (way) entertain feelings of censoriousness toward those who may differ from us in opinions as to the prime cause of this disturbance.
senseriousnes B1 | sensoriousnes B2 | censoriousness B3 (c) brings] B1, B2 | bring[begin strikethrough]s[end strikethrough] B3 (d) the] the same B2, B3 (e) excites Mens passions and] Excites Men passions to B2 | excite[begin strikethrough]s[end strikethrough] mens passions and B3 (f) transports] B1, B2 | transport[begin strikethrough]s[end strikethrough] B3 (g) conversation] em.
According to Forster, the public school types have "undeveloped hearts", with Ronny in A Passage to India as a typical example: "His self-complacency, his censoriousness, his lack of subtlety, all grew vividly beneath a tropic sky" (Forster 96).
Until, that is, confronted by the Venus of Urbino, when he reverts to his old plain-thinking, plain-speaking self, with an unwelcome dollop of sexual censoriousness superadded.
The course of their conversation is eminently conventional: the rabbis attack Allen for his long-standing lack of serf-restraint; Allen blames the rabbis' censoriousness for driving him away from the religion.