necrosis

(redirected from central necrosis)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to central necrosis: Frank necrosis, necroses, necrotized

ne·cro·sis

 (nə-krō′sĭs, nĕ-)
n. pl. ne·cro·ses (-sēz′)
Death of cells through injury or disease, especially in a localized area of a tissue or organ.

[Late Latin necrōsis, a causing to die, killing, from Greek nekrōsis, death, from nekroun, to make dead, from nekros, corpse; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

ne·crot′ic (-krŏt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

necrosis

(nɛˈkrəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Pathology) the death of one or more cells in the body, usually within a localized area, as from an interruption of the blood supply to that part
2. (Botany) death of plant tissue due to disease, frost, etc
[C17: New Latin from Greek nekrōsis, from nekroun to kill, from nekros corpse]
necrotic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ne•cro•sis

(nəˈkroʊ sɪs)

n.
death of a circumscribed portion of animal or plant tissue.
[1655–65; < New Latin < Greek nékrōsis state of death = nekrō-, variant s. of nekroûn to kill, mortify]
ne•crot′ic (-ˈkrɒt ɪk) adj.
nec•ro•tize (ˈnɛk rəˌtaɪz) v.i., v.t. -tized, -tiz•ing.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

necrosis

the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Body, Human
the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Death, Decaying
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)
death - the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism; "the animal died a painful death"
myonecrosis - localized death of muscle cell fibers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
nekroosi
afstervingnecrose

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnécrose f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnecrosi f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

necrosis

n necrosis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thoracoscopic resection of the three types of nodules (Figure 2a) revealed a necrotizing, granulomatous inflammation with central necrosis and margins containing epithelioid cells, fibroblasts, lymphocytes, and histiocytes (Figure 2b).
On CT, a mass with central necrosis is often present.
Histologic evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of liver showed coalescent granulomas throughout the liver parenchyma, with central necrosis surrounded by activated macrophages and giant cells (Figure).
In some cases, IMTUB may show high signal intensity centrally and low signal peripherally on T2 images, reflecting central necrosis. Cystoscopy is particularly important since it may indicate the tumor size and location.
A PET CT scan showed diffuse increased metabolic activity in large soft tissue anterior mediastinal mass, along with central necrosis. AFP (Alpha fetoprotein) escalated to 16858 ug/L.
There was no central necrosis or evidence of polynuclear neutrophils.
There were scattered granulomas with central necrosis. Fite's acid-fast staining was negative for acid-fast bacilli.
CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed a lobulated and heterogeneous liver hilar mass with a central necrosis, measuring 2.4 x 3.9 cm.
Histologically, they are trabeculated with or without central necrosis depending on the size [16].
It is seen that myoma included by central necrosis depleted by cervix in the posterior part of the uterus.
On gross examination, the cut surface of hepatic nodule (Figure 1(d)) showed a poorly demarcated portal nodule in lobulated margins with central necrosis, measuring 35 x 26 mm in diameter, which appeared clearly whitish in color, accompanied by not only gross but also histopathological portal vein permeation (Figure 1(e)).
It also demonstrated a large heterogeneously enhancing mass about 6 x 9.5 cm with central necrosis in the upper abdomen that appears to be originating from the gastric antrum (greater curve).

Full browser ?