centuriation


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centuriation

(sɛnˌtjʊərɪˈeɪʃən)
n
the process or act of dividing land into centuries or equal areas undertaken by the Romans
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The ancient Romans used to reward their legionnaires with plots of land, through a system known as"centuriation." The Romans adopted the system in the 4th century BC, when Rome was still a vibrant republic.
One particularly aggressive proponent of centuriation was Emperor Septimius Severus, who ruled from AD 192 to 211 and whose 400,000-man army was spread across an empire of 70 million people, from the Atlantic to the eastern shores of the Black Sea and from northern England to southern Egypt.
(30) There is no evidence of any imperial estates on Cyprus, but centuriation (laying out of agricultural field strips by imperial surveyors) near Salamis might indicate the reallocation of land confiscated from Ptolemaic elites.
Based on an analysis of aerial photographs and maps of selected areas in Syria, researchers have concluded that the present landscape of these areas has preserved distinct traces of lotting division and centuriation. According to these scholars, at least some of those remains date back to Roman times.
(1982): "Centuriation et organisation du territorie: Notes preliminaires sur l'exemple de Merida".
Recent work by David Romano has revealed evidence for Caesarian and Flavian centuriation of the northern Corinthian plain, enveloping Kromna.
The Romans we re the first civilization to systematically manage territory on a large scale by introducing a technique called centuriation (Caravello and Giacomin 1993).
Some are numismatic (where, on what standard, and with what designs coins were minted), while others are related to Roman engineering (centuriation, city layout, road-building, aqueducts).
The forms include buildings, such as theatres and market-complexes, civic institutions, such as the oligarchic council and the executive magistracy, religious institutions and protocols, habits of expression such as the publicly inscribed charter, methods of land settlement and organization, particularly the construction of cities and centuriation, and the mass manufacture and export of material goods such as terra sigillata.
There is, however, another explanation for Habrocomes' point of disembarkation: the alignment of successive phases of centuriation between Nuceria and the coast before the eruption shows that, even before AD 79, the entire territory was controlled by Nuceria.
"City Planning, Centuriation, and Land Division in Roman Corinth: Colonia Laus Iulia Corinthiensis and Colonia Iulia Flavia Augusta Corinthiensis," in Corinth XX, pp.