cerebellum

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cer·e·bel·lum

 (sĕr′ə-bĕl′əm)
n. pl. cer·e·bel·lums or cer·e·bel·la (-bĕl′ə)
The trilobed structure of the brain, lying posterior to the pons and medulla oblongata and inferior to the occipital lobes of the cerebral hemispheres, that is responsible for the regulation and coordination of complex voluntary muscular movement as well as the maintenance of posture and balance.

[Medieval Latin, from Latin, diminutive of cerebrum, brain; see ker- in Indo-European roots.]

cer′e·bel′lar (-bĕl′ər) adj.

cerebellum

(ˌsɛrɪˈbɛləm)
n, pl -lums or -la (-lə)
(Anatomy) one of the major divisions of the vertebrate brain, situated in man above the medulla oblongata and beneath the cerebrum, whose function is coordination of voluntary movements and maintenance of bodily equilibrium
[C16: from Latin, diminutive of cerebrum]
ˌcereˈbellar adj

cer•e•bel•lum

(ˌsɛr əˈbɛl əm)

n., pl. -bel•lums, -bel•la (-ˈbɛl ə)
the rounded portion of the brain, directly behind the cerebrum in birds and mammals, that serves mainly to coordinate movement, posture, and balance.
[1555–65; < Latin: brain, diminutive of cerebrum (for formation see castle)]
cer`e•bel′lar, adj.

cer·e·bel·lum

(sĕr′ə-bĕl′əm)
The part of the vertebrate brain that is located below the cerebrum at the rear of the skull and coordinates balance and muscle activity. In humans and other mammals, the cerebellum is made up of two connecting parts, called hemispheres, consisting of a core of white matter surrounded by gray matter.

cerebellum


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The largest part of the hindbrain, sprouting below the back of the cerebrum. It helps produce smoothly controlled and coordinated muscular movements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cerebellum - a major division of the vertebrate braincerebellum - a major division of the vertebrate brain; situated above the medulla oblongata and beneath the cerebrum in humans
arteria cerebelli, cerebellar artery - an artery that supplies the cerebellum
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
cerebellar hemisphere - either of two lateral lobes of the cerebellum
dentate nucleus - a large laminar nucleus of grey matter within the white matter of each cerebral hemisphere
vermis, vermis cerebelli - the narrow central part of the cerebellum between the two hemispheres
paleocerebellum - the anterior lobe of the cerebellum which was one of the earliest parts of the hindbrain to develop in mammals
hindbrain, rhombencephalon - the posterior portion of the brain including cerebellum and brainstem
Translations
mozeček
pikkuaivot

cerebellum

[ˌserɪˈbeləm] N (cerebellums or cerebella (pl)) [ˌserɪˈbelə]cerebelo m

cerebellum

nKleinhirn nt, → Zerebellum nt (spec)

cerebellum

[ˌsɛrɪˈbɛləm] n (Anat) → cervelletto

cer·e·bel·lum

n. cerebelo, parte posterior del cerebro, centro de coordinación de los movimientos musculares voluntarios.

cerebellum

n cerebelo
References in periodicals archive ?
The background cerebellar cortex was infiltrated by tumor cells, which also showed subpial accumulation and extension to the subarachnoid spaces.
The learning process underlying EBCC is made of fast events such as acquisition and extinction, likely taking place in the cerebellar cortex, while a slower consolidation phase is probably linked to the activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) [2,4].
Cisplatin eventually damages cerebral, cerebellar cortex, and hippocampus, which ultimately results in seizures, cognition deficits, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies (Chtourou et al., 2015; Harandi et al., 2015).
The Purkinje cells are flask shaped cells arranged in a single layer in the cerebellar cortex. They form multiple synapses with granule cells and send inhibitory projections to deep cerebellar nuclei.
Studies in monkeys have shown how cerebellar cortex neurons are activated at the initiation of a particular movement [23, 24].
Because we were interested in grey matter structures, bilateral volumes of the following 9 cortical and subcortical regions were extracted and used in the statistical analyses: primary motor cortex (M1), SMA, PMC, cingulate cortex area (CMA), thalamus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, and cerebellar cortex. These 9 cortical and subcortical regions of interest (ROI) were chosen, given their incontestable involvement in motor control.
Histopathogical findings include widening of the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex with replacement by abnormal ganglion cells, absence of the Purkinje cell layer, and hypertrophy of the granular cell layer.(5) Clinically, the duration of symptoms is variable, ranging from a few months to over 10 years.
(31) The Purkinje cells, which are the only output neurons from the cerebellar cortex and become postmitotic at E10.5-12.5 in mice, (32,33) migrate radially towards the pial surface during embryonic stages (34) (Fig.
In the control group, cerebellum appeared as irregular folia formed of external gray matter (cerebellar cortex) and internal white matter.

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