tonsil

(redirected from cerebellar tonsil)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ton·sil

 (tŏn′səl)
n.
A small oral mass of lymphoid tissue, especially either of two such masses embedded in the lateral walls of the opening between the mouth and the pharynx, of uncertain function, but believed to help protect the body from respiratory infections.

[From Latin tōnsillae, tonsils, diminutive of tōlēs, swollen tonsils.]

ton′sil·lar adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tonsil

(ˈtɒnsəl)
n
1. (Anatomy) Also called: palatine tonsil either of two small masses of lymphatic tissue situated one on each side of the back of the mouth.
2. (Anatomy) anatomy any small rounded mass of tissue, esp lymphatic tissue
[C17: from Latin tōnsillae (pl) tonsils, of uncertain origin]
ˈtonsillar, ˈtonsillary adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ton•sil

(ˈtɒn səl)

n.
a prominent oval mass of lymphoid tissue on each side of the throat.
[1595–1605; < Latin tōnsillae (pl.)]
ton′sil•lar, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tonsil - either of two masses of lymphatic tissue one on each side of the oral pharynxtonsil - either of two masses of lymphatic tissue one on each side of the oral pharynx
lymphatic tissue, lymphoid tissue - tissue making up the lymphatic system
nasopharynx - cavity forming the upper part of the pharynx
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tonsil

noun
Related words
adjectives tonsillar, tonsillary, amygdaline
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
لَوْزَه، لَوْزَةُ الحَلْق
mandlekrční mandle
mandel
nielurisarisa
mandula
hálskirtill
anginatonzilė
mandele

tonsil

[ˈtɒnsl] Namígdala f, angina f (Mex)
to have one's tonsils outquitarse las amígdalas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tonsil

nMandel f; to have one’s tonsils outsich (dat)die Mandeln herausnehmen lassen; tonsil action or hockey (inf)Knutscherei f, → Herumknutschen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tonsil

[ˈtɒnsl] ntonsilla
to have one's tonsils out → farsi operare di tonsille
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tonsil

(ˈtonsil) noun
either of two lumps of tissue at the back of the throat. He had to have his tonsils (taken) out.
ˌtonsilˈlitis (tonsiˈlaitis) noun
painful inflammation of the tonsils. She had / was suffering from tonsillitis.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

ton·sil

n. amígdala, tonsila;
cerebellar ______ cerebelosa;
lingual ______ lingual;
palatine ______ palatina;
pharyngeal ______ faríngea.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tonsil

n amígdala, angina (fam)
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anatomical illustrations of the CCJ (3) are provided showing normal cerebellar tonsil positioning (Figure 6A) and low-lying cerebellar tonsils (Figure 6B).
Both the distance of the plane of the foramen magnum to the caudal tip of the cerebellar tonsil and the distance from the plane of the foramen magnum to the obex were obtained as illustrated in Figure 1.
Magnetic resonance imaging (Figure 1) revealed an acute infarction in the left cerebellar tonsil, left cerebellar hemisphere, and left medullary restiform body, in the territory of the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA).
It is just this "foramen magnum position" underneath human skulls that give cerebellar tonsil and even medulla oblongata the chance to herniate downward out of the foramen magnum powered by gravity.
Cerebellar tonsil reduction: The bottom of the cerebellum, know as the cerebellar tonsils, are shortened so they no longer protrude past the base of the skull and into the spinal column.
The left cerebellar tonsil was displaced backward, and the right cerebellar tonsil was herniated and closely apposed to the medulla.
Generally, when a part of the cerebellum, which is known as cerebellar tonsils, is located under the foramen magnum, it is known as a Chiari malformation.Chiari malformation is categorised into four types: Type I Chiari malformation is asymptomatic.
The term Chiari malformation (CM), also known as the Arnold-Chiari malformation, refers to caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum.
Chiari I malformation is defined radiographically as a simple displacement of the cerebellar tonsils 5 mm or greater below the foramen magnum and is distinguished from Chiari II and Chiari III malformations occurring with myelodysplasia and cervical encephalocele, respectively (9).
Among the possible malformations of the craniocervical junction, Chiari malformation Type I is notable for its frequency and it is defined as a set of congenital anomalies of the metencephalon that result in abnormal relations between various structures: The cerebellum, the cerebellar tonsils, the medulla oblongata, the cervical medulla and the base of the skull.
Two hours later, the Spa[O.sub.2] and the ETC[O.sub.2] slightly decreased and anisocoria was observed; and an urgent CT scan of the head demonstrated a diffuse cerebral edema and the herniation of the cerebellar tonsils (Figures 1(a) and 1(b), respectively).
To investigate for an occipital headache, at 3.7 years old, she underwent an MRI that disclosed a CM1 with herniation of the cerebellar tonsils beneath the foramen magnum of 17 mm (Figure 1).