cerebrum

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cer·e·brum

 (sĕr′ə-brəm, sə-rē′-)
n. pl. cer·e·brums or cer·e·bra (-brə)
The large rounded structure of the brain occupying most of the cranial cavity, divided into two cerebral hemispheres that are joined at the bottom by the corpus callosum. It controls and integrates motor, sensory, and higher mental functions, such as thought, reason, emotion, and memory.

[Latin, brain; see ker- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cerebrum

(ˈsɛrɪbrəm)
n, pl -brums or -bra (-brə)
1. (Anatomy) the anterior portion of the brain of vertebrates, consisting of two lateral hemispheres joined by a thick band of fibres: the dominant part of the brain in man, associated with intellectual function, emotion, and personality. See telencephalon
2. (Anatomy) the brain considered as a whole
3. (Zoology) the main neural bundle or ganglion of certain invertebrates
[C17: from Latin: the brain]
ˈcereˌbroid adj
cerebric adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ce•re•brum

(səˈri brəm, ˈsɛr ə-)

n., pl. -brums, -bra (-brə).
the forward and upper part of the brain, involved with voluntary movement and conscious processes, in mammals and birds greatly enlarged. Compare cerebral hemisphere.
[1605–15; < Latin: brain]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cer·e·brum

(sĕr′ə-brəm, sə-rē′brəm)
The largest part of the vertebrate brain, filling most of the skull and consisting of two cerebral hemispheres divided by a deep groove and joined by a mass of nerve fibers. The cerebrum processes complex sensory information and controls voluntary muscle activity. In humans it is the center of thought, learning, and memory.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cerebrum


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The upper, major part of the brain, with two hemispheres, and including the diencephalon. It handles consciousness, learning, memory, emotions, sensations, and voluntary movements.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cerebrum - anterior portion of the brain consisting of two hemispherescerebrum - anterior portion of the brain consisting of two hemispheres; dominant part of the brain in humans
central sulcus, fissure of Rolando, Rolando's fissure, sulcus centralis - a brain fissure extending upward on the lateral surface of both hemispheres; separates the frontal and parietal lobes
fissure of Sylvius, lateral cerebral sulcus, sulcus lateralis cerebri, Sylvian fissure - the deepest and most prominent of the cortical fissures; separates the frontal lobes and temporal lobes in both hemispheres
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
cerebral hemisphere, hemisphere - either half of the cerebrum
cerebral cortex, cerebral mantle, cortex, pallium - the layer of unmyelinated neurons (the grey matter) forming the cortex of the cerebrum
gyrus, convolution - a convex fold or elevation in the surface of the brain
telencephalon - the anterior division of the forebrain; the cerebrum and related parts of the hypothalamus
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
koncový mozek
isot aivot
telencephalon

cerebrum

[ˈserəbrəm] N (cerebrums or cerebra (pl)) [ˈserəbrə]cerebro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cerebrum

nGroßhirn nt, → Zerebrum nt (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cerebrum

[ˈsɛrɪbrəm] n (Anat) → cervello
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cer·e·brum

n. cerebro, encéfalo, centro de coordinación de actividades sensoriales e intelectuales.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cerebrum

n cerebro
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A reply along these lines does not establish that we are distinct from our cerebrums, and anyone who wishes to maintain that we are will have to find a different way of coping with the "too many thinkers" objection, but it does pose a problem for Olson's central argument, which (arguably) combines a biological bias with an overly narrow view of the way animals and persons might be related.
Olson's favoured scenario of this sort, tailor-made to mesh with his account of the persistence conditions of organisms, is based on the supposition that our mental states and capacities are located in the upper parts of the brain, the cerebrum, which is surgically separable from those parts of the lower brain responsible for autonomic bodily functions.
Irrespective of what a biologist or surgeon might make of a cerebrum transplant, what would a psychologist make of it?