ceremonial

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ceremonial

pertaining to a ceremony; formal; ritual: ceremonial event
Not to be confused with:
ceremonious – courtly; done with ceremony; elaborately polite: ceremonious display of friendship
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

cer·e·mo·ni·al

 (sĕr′ə-mō′nē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, appropriate to, or characterized by ceremony; formal or ritual.
2. Involved or used in ceremonies: ceremonial garb.
n.
1. A set of ceremonies prescribed for an occasion; a ritual.
2. A ceremony or rite.

cer′e·mo′ni·al·ism n.
cer′e·mo′ni·al·ist n.
cer′e·mo′ni·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ceremonial

(ˌsɛrɪˈməʊnɪəl)
adj
involving or relating to ceremony or ritual
n
1. the observance of formality, esp in etiquette
2. a plan for formal observances on a particular occasion; ritual
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity
a. the prescribed order of rites and ceremonies
b. a book containing this
ˌcereˈmonialism n
ˌcereˈmonialist n
ˌcereˈmonially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cer•e•mo•ni•al

(ˌsɛr əˈmoʊ ni əl)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or characterized by ceremony; formal; ritual: a ceremonial occasion.
2. used in connection with ceremonies: ceremonial robes.
n.
3. a ceremonial act or system.
[1350–1400; < Medieval Latin]
cer`e•mo′ni•al•ism, n.
cer`e•mo′ni•al•ist, n.
cer`e•mo′ni•al•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ceremonial - a formal event performed on a special occasionceremonial - a formal event performed on a special occasion; "a ceremony commemorating Pearl Harbor"
social function, social occasion, occasion, affair, function - a vaguely specified social event; "the party was quite an affair"; "an occasion arranged to honor the president"; "a seemingly endless round of social functions"
circumstance - formal ceremony about important occasions; "pomp and circumstance"
funeral - a ceremony at which a dead person is buried or cremated; "hundreds of people attended his funeral"
hymeneals, nuptials, wedding, wedding ceremony - the social event at which the ceremony of marriage is performed
pageantry, pageant - a rich and spectacular ceremony
dedication - a ceremony in which something (as a building) is dedicated to some goal or purpose
opening - a ceremony accompanying the start of some enterprise
commemoration, memorialisation, memorialization - a ceremony to honor the memory of someone or something
military ceremony - a formal ceremony performed by military personnel
induction, initiation, installation - a formal entry into an organization or position or office; "his initiation into the club"; "he was ordered to report for induction into the army"; "he gave a speech as part of his installation into the hall of fame"
exercise - (usually plural) a ceremony that involves processions and speeches; "academic exercises"
fire walking - the ceremony of walking barefoot over hot stones or a bed of embers
formalities, formality - a requirement of etiquette or custom; "a mere formality"
Maundy - a public ceremony on Maundy Thursday when the monarch distributes Maundy money
potlatch - a ceremonial feast held by some Indians of the northwestern coast of North America (as in celebrating a marriage or a new accession) in which the host gives gifts to tribesmen and others to display his superior wealth (sometimes, formerly, to his own impoverishment)
Adj.1.ceremonial - marked by pomp or ceremony or formality; "a ceremonial occasion"; "ceremonial garb"
formal - being in accord with established forms and conventions and requirements (as e.g. of formal dress); "pay one's formal respects"; "formal dress"; "a formal ball"; "the requirement was only formal and often ignored"; "a formal education"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

ceremonial

adjective
1. formal, public, official, ritual, stately, solemn, liturgical, courtly, ritualistic He represented the nation on ceremonial occasions.
formal simple, relaxed, casual, informal
noun
1. ritual, ceremony, rite, formality, solemnity It is difficult to imagine a more impressive ceremonial.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

ceremonial

adjective
Of or characterized by ceremony:
noun
A formal act or set of acts prescribed by ritual:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
احْتِفالي، رَسْمي
obřadnýslavnostní
ceremoniel
ceremonijalceremonijalanobredni
szertartásosszertartásrendünnepélyes
hátíîlegur
slovesen

ceremonial

[ˌserɪˈməʊnɪəl]
A. ADJ [rite] → ceremonial; [dress] → de ceremonia, de gala
B. Nceremonial m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ceremonial

[ˌsɛrɪˈməʊniəl]
adj [dinner, occasion] → de cérémonie
n
(royal, official)cérémonial m
(religious) (= rite) → rituel m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ceremonial

adjzeremoniell
nZeremoniell nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ceremonial

[ˌsɛrɪˈməʊnɪəl]
1. adj (rite) → formale, solenne; (dress) → da cerimonia
2. ncerimoniale m; (rite) → rito
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ceremony

(ˈserəməni) , ((American) -mouni) plural ˈceremonies noun
1. a sacred or formal act, eg a wedding, funeral etc. a marriage ceremony.
2. solemn display and formality. pomp and ceremony.
ˌcereˈmonial (-ˈməu-) adjective
formal or official. a ceremonial occasion such as the opening of parliament.
ˌcereˈmonially adverb
ˌcereˈmonious (-ˈməu-) adjective
(negative unceremonious) carefully formal or polite.
ˌcereˈmoniously adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
They even had a rude calendar of the fasts and festivals of the Romish Church, and some traces of its ceremonials. These have become blended with their own wild rites, and present a strange medley; civilized and barbarous.
The great events of his life are of public as well as private significance, appropriately, therefore, invested with public ceremonial. Thus used to living in the public eye, the actors carry off their parts at weddings and other dramatic ceremonials, with more spirit than is easy to a townsman, who is naturally made self-conscious by being suddenly called upon to fill for a day a public position for which he has had no training.
-Place Where Captain Cook was Killed.- John Young, a Nautical Governor.- His Story.- Waititi - A Royal Residence.- A Royal Visit - Grand Ceremonials.- Close Dealing- A Royal Pork Merchant- Grievances of a Matter-of-Fact Man.
I remember, somewhere, sitting in a circle with Japanese fishermen, Kanaka boat-steerers from our own vessels, and a young Danish sailor fresh from cowboying in the Argentine and with a penchant for native customs and ceremonials. And with due and proper and most intricate Japanese ceremonial we of the circle drank saki, pale, mild, and lukewarm, from tiny porcelain bowls.
But now, as they represented the person of the king, they thought it necessary to preserve the dignity of their station by the practice of high and gorgeous ceremonials. And, besides, the profitable offices under the government were filled by men who had lived in London, and had there contracted fashionable and luxurious habits of living which they would not now lay aside.
Vanity, it may be, chose to mortify itself, by putting on, for ceremonials of pomp and state, the garments that had been wrought by her sinful hands.