certitude


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cer·ti·tude

 (sûr′tĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. The state of being certain or convinced of something; complete assurance; confidence: Who can say with certitude how strong the economy will be next year?
2. Something that is assured or believed to be true: "serene certitudes instilled in me by my family and teachers" (Garry Wills).

[Middle English, from Late Latin certitūdō, from Latin certus, certain; see certain.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

certitude

(ˈsɜːtɪˌtjuːd)
n
confidence; certainty
[C15: from Church Latin certitūdō, from Latin certus certain]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cer•ti•tude

(ˈsɜr tɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
freedom from doubt, esp. in matters of faith or opinion; certainty.
[1375–1425; < Late Latin certitūdō < Latin certi-, comb. form of certus sure (see certain)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.certitude - total certainty or greater certainty than circumstances warrant
certainty - the state of being certain; "his certainty reassured the others"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

certitude

noun certainty, confidence, conviction, assurance, sureness, positiveness I cannot say with any degree of certitude what will happen next.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

certitude

noun
The fact or condition of being without doubt:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

certitude

[ˈsɜːtɪtjuːd] Ncertidumbre f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

certitude

[ˈsɜːrtɪtjuːd] ncertitude f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

certitude

nGewissheit f, → Sicherheit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

certitude

[ˈsɜːtɪˌtjuːd] n (frm) → certezza, sicurezza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Their coming could have been predicted with the same certitude that astronomers to-day predict the outcome of the movements of stars.
After this I inquired in general into what is essential I to the truth and certainty of a proposition; for since I had discovered one which I knew to be true, I thought that I must likewise be able to discover the ground of this certitude. And as I observed that in the words I think, therefore I am, there is nothing at all which gives me assurance of their truth beyond this, that I see very clearly that in order to think it is necessary to exist, I concluded that I might take, as a general rule, the principle, that all the things which we very clearly and distinctly conceive are true, only observing, however, that there is some difficulty in rightly determining the objects which we distinctly conceive.
Some have felt that these blundering lives are due to the inconvenient indefiniteness with which the Supreme Power has fashioned the natures of women: if there were one level of feminine incompetence as strict as the ability to count three and no more, the social lot of women might be treated with scientific certitude. Meanwhile the indefiniteness remains, and the limits of variation are really much wider than any one would imagine from the sameness of women's coiffure and the favorite love-stories in prose and verse.
In addition to the stiffening afforded his backbone by the conscious ownership of eleven millions, he possessed an enormous certitude.
From his calm-mad heights, with the certitude of a god, he beholds all life as evil.
With some difficulty, after many turnings and new inquiries, they reached Prison Street; and the grim walls of the jail, the first object that answered to any image in Silas's memory, cheered him with the certitude, which no assurance of the town's name had hitherto given him, that he was in his native place.
Doubtless Sylvia was not entirely suitable to me, and to marry her was to be faithless to that vision of the highest, that wonderful unknown woman of the apocalyptic moorland, whose face Sylvia had not even momentarily banished from my dreams, and whom, with an unaccountable certitude, I still believed to be the woman God had destined for me; but, all things considered, Sylvia was surely as pretty an answer to prayer as a man could reasonably hope for.
Some of the masters whose influence left a trace upon my character to this very day, combined a fierceness of conception with a certitude of execution upon the basis of just appreciation of means and ends which is the highest quality of the man of action.
But a voice behind me, the unmistakable voice of Wolf Larsen, strong with the invincible certitude of the man and mellow with appreciation of the words he was quoting, aroused me.
Vronsky's life was particularly happy in that he had a code of principles, which defined with unfailing certitude what he ought and what he ought not to do.
There were four of these steps, and she went up them, a step at a time, slowly, unwaveringly, and with so dogged certitude that it never entered my mind that her strength could fail her and let that hundred-weight sack fall from the lean and withered frame that wellnigh doubled under it.
He knew his friend had always plenty of money, and he knew also, with profound certitude, that his success would enable him to repay it.