dilatation

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dil·a·ta·tion

 (dĭl′ə-tā′shən, dī′lə-)
n.
Dilation.

dil′a·ta′tion·al adj.

dil•a•ta•tion

(ˌdɪl əˈteɪ ʃən, ˌdaɪ lə-)

also dilation



n.
1. a dilated formation or part.
2. an abnormal enlargement of an organ, aperture, or canal of the body.
3.
a. an enlargement made in a body aperture or canal for surgical or medical treatment.
b. a restoration to normal patency of an abnormally small body opening or passageway.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Old French) < Latin]
dil`a•ta′tion•al, adj.

dilatation

The expanding or enlarging of a part of the body. See D C.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dilatation - the state of being stretched beyond normal dimensions
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
tympanites - distension of the abdomen that is caused by the accumulation of gas in the intestines or the peritoneal cavity
ectasia, ectasis - dilatation or distension of a hollow organ
varicocele - dilatation of the veins associated with the spermatic cord in the testes
2.dilatation - the act of expanding an aperture; "the dilation of the pupil of the eye"
enlargement, expansion - the act of increasing (something) in size or volume or quantity or scope
vasodilation - dilation of blood vessels (especially the arteries)
mydriasis - reflex pupillary dilation as a muscle pulls the iris outward; occurs in response to a decrease in light or certain drugs
Translations

dilatation

, dilation
nAusdehnung f, → Erweiterung f; (of pupils)Erweiterung f; dilatation and curettageDilation und Kürettage f (spec), → Ausschabung f

dil·a·ta·tion

n. dilatación, aumento o expansión anormal de un órgano u orificio.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Intranatal care child birth simulator along with attachment for cervical dilatation (closed os, 4cm, 6cm, 8cm, fully dilated cervix
The benefits presented by the authors include that the device 1) does not require that an intrauterine array be deployed up to and abutting the fundus and cornu, 2) does not necessitate cervical dilatation, 3) is a free-flowing vapor system that can navigate differences in uterine contour and sizes (up to 12 cm in length), and 4) accomplishes ablation in 2 minutes.
Friedman introduced partograph in 1954; he concluded that progressive cervical dilatation is the most important factor in progress of labour and plotted cervical dilatation against time on his graph.
In patients with cervical dilatation with or without prolapse of the amniotic membranes into the vagina, the procedure is conducted as an emergency cerclage.
In 2009, Grobman (13) included several factors at the time of admission to the delivery room: BMI at delivery, preeclampsia, gestational age at birth, cervical dilatation, effacement, stage and induction of labor, achieving a better performance of the model.
On multivariate analysis, multiparity, greater cervical dilatation after balloon removal and the use of epidural analgesia were associated with a decreased risk of CS, whereas the presence of GDM and oligohydramnios was associated with an increased risk of CS (Table 2).
An epidural catheter was inserted after the cervical dilatation was 3-5 cm in the vaginal examination performed by the gynecologist.
It was an attempt to assess some physical properties in consideration of cervical dilatation at the time of both, estrus and parturition.
The selection of type of analgesia method was done on the basis of cervical dilatation and softness.
Among women with threatened preterm labor, cervical length was assessed in women with and without cervical dilatation. It was reported that risk for PB was higher in women with cervical dilatation, while short cervical length was independently associated with preterm birth [33].
Other studies reported that the severity of dysmenorrhea was reduced by cervical dilatation in a recursive manner with artificial methods [4] and hot pad application [14].
The main intrapartum complications include inability to attain adequate cervical dilatation, as well as cervical laceration, obstructive labor, hysterorrhexis at the lower segment of the uterus, fetal death, and maternal morbidity.