cetacean


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Related to cetacean: whale

ce·ta·cean

 (sĭ-tā′shən)
n.
Any of various marine mammals of the order Cetacea, including the whales, dolphins, and porpoises, having the general shape of a fish with forelimbs modified to form flippers, a tail with horizontal flukes, and one or two blowholes for breathing.

[From New Latin Cētācea, order name, from Latin cētus, whale; see Cetus.]

ce·ta′cean, ce·ta′ceous (-shəs) adj.

cetacean

(sɪˈteɪʃən)
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Cetacea, an order of aquatic placental mammals having no hind limbs and a blowhole for breathing: includes toothed whales (dolphins, porpoises, etc) and whalebone whales (rorquals, right whales, etc)
n
(Animals) a whale
[C19: from New Latin Cētācea, ultimately from Latin cētus whale, from Greek kētos]

ce•ta•cean

(sɪˈteɪ ʃən)

adj.
1. belonging to the Cetacea, an order of aquatic, chiefly marine mammals, including the whales and dolphins.
n.
2. a cetacean mammal.
[1830–40; < New Latin Cetace(a) (Latin cēt(us) whale, cetacean (< Greek kêtos)]
ce•ta′ceous, adj.

ce·ta·cean

(sĭ-tā′shən)
Any of various, often very large marine mammals having an almost hairless body that resembles that of a fish. Cetaceans have a flat, horizontal tail and forelimbs modified into broad flippers. Whales, dolphins, and porpoises are cetaceans.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cetacean - large aquatic carnivorous mammal with fin-like forelimbs no hind limbs, including: whalescetacean - large aquatic carnivorous mammal with fin-like forelimbs no hind limbs, including: whales; dolphins; porpoises; narwhals
aquatic mammal - whales and dolphins; manatees and dugongs; walruses; seals
Cetacea, order Cetacea - an order of Eutheria
whale - any of the larger cetacean mammals having a streamlined body and breathing through a blowhole on the head
fluke - either of the two lobes of the tail of a cetacean
blowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skull
pod - a group of aquatic mammals
Adj.1.cetacean - of or relating to whales and dolphins etc
Translations

cetacean

[sɪˈteɪʃɪən]
A. ADJcetáceo
B. Ncetáceo m

cetacean

[sɪˈteɪʃən] ncétacé m

cetacean

nWal m, → Zetazee f (spec)
adjWal(fisch)-, Zetazeen- (spec)
References in classic literature ?
And though none of them precisely answer to any known species of the present time, they are yet sufficiently akin to them in general respects, to justify their taking ranks as Cetacean fossils.
The public demanded sharply that the seas should at any price be relieved from this formidable cetacean. [1]
In plain prose, here are four whales as well known to the students of Cetacean History as Marius or Sylla to the classic scholar.
We can also understand the apparent paradox, that the very same characters are analogical when one class or order is compared with another, but give true affinities when the members of the same class or order are compared one with another: thus the shape of the body and fin-like limbs are only analogical when whales are compared with fishes, being adaptations in both classes for swimming through the water; but the shape of the body and fin-like limbs serve as characters exhibiting true affinity between the several members of the whale family; for these cetaceans agree in so many characters, great and small, that we cannot doubt that they have inherited their general shape of body and structure of limbs from a common ancestor.
The 2.5m-long whale is now being analysed by the UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme - dubbed "CSI of the Sea" - at the Zoological Society of London's (ZSL) Regent's Park site.
Nearly a quarter of the world's cetacean species have been found in Scotland's waters.
Ultimately, Peregocetus would join other Cetacean species to split and become the whales or dolphins humans recognize today.
The cetacean, he said, was already buried before the WWF-P team could reach there.
Yang Wei-cheng, Chairman of the Taiwan Cetacean Society, told CNA that blood tests have been completed and only after other follow-up examinations such as ultrasound are to be performed, can it be determined what the next step should be.
This tracheal bronchus is a notable feature for cetacean species, facilitating gas exchange and increasing diving time, as previously described in other river dolphins, such as Platanista gangetica (Endo et al.).
Our current understanding of the large-scale distribution of whales comes from the three circumpolar cetacean sighting surveys (CP I--III) carried out under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission's (IWC) International Decade of Cetacean Research (IDCR) and Southern Ocean Whale Ecosystem Research (SOWER) programmes from 1978/1979 to 2003/2004 (Herr et al., 2016).
Cetacean sightings and acoustic detections during a seismic survey off Nicaragua and Costa Rica, November-December 2004.