cetological


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ce·tol·o·gy

 (sĭ-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The zoology of whales and related aquatic mammals.

[Latin cētus, whale; see Cetus + -logy.]

ce′to·log′i·cal (sēt′l-ŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ce·tol′o·gist n.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
But I now leave my cetological System standing thus unfinished, even as the great Cathedral of Cologne was left, with the crane still standing upon the top of the uncompleted tower.
A survey of the status quo of whale survival, Young's book describes efforts by the science community to promote cetological research and enjoyment of the earth's great sea creatures.
But from the moment of its discovery in the modern age, the history of Spitsbergen became associated with the exploitation of natural resources; (142) denuded of its cetological economy, human interest in Spitsbergen swept away, along with the detritus left by flensers at the water's edge.
Thus, in his presentation of cetological lore, Ishmael implicitly responds to God's rhetorical questions on Leviathan in Job 41, assuming the paradoxical position of playfully challenging the divine representation of the monster's inscrutability while ultimately conceding its veracity.
But I now leave my cetological System standing thus unfinished, even as the great Cathedral of Cologne was left, with the crane still standing upon the top of the uncompleted tower.
Here he juxtaposes accounts that invalidate each other, imitating the cetological excerpts at the beginning of Moby-Dick where Melville's sub-sub-librarian futilely tries to grasp the transcendent reality of the whale through moldy old texts.