cetologist


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ce·tol·o·gy

 (sĭ-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The zoology of whales and related aquatic mammals.

[Latin cētus, whale; see Cetus + -logy.]

ce′to·log′i·cal (sēt′l-ŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ce·tol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The unlikely notion that whale music can illuminate these themes stands confirmed in the work of cetologist of John Ford.
The whales are named after a famous Japanese cetologist, Hideo Omura.
The uncanny not only destroys the illusion of any stable subject position but also the possibility of any stable meaning, since sometimes the land is not stable at all (Bernstein 2004, 1135).What this means in the case of Ghosh's novel is that neither Piya nor Kanai will ever regain their confidence in their respective knowledges (Kanai and language, Piya as a cetologist).
The photographs are copious and fascinating, including electron microscope views of hideous mite larvae and a shot of the inebriated cetologist poking at a whale carcass.
omurai, honors the late Japanese cetologist Hideo Omura.
Scholars have proved very astute in revealing the cetological and natural historical sources Melville used in Moby-Dick, but no one has yet explored Melville's originality as a scientific thinker.(3) I hope to demonstrate that Melville was not merely an amateur cetologist but a powerful, innovative philosopher of biology, intuitively (if not empirically) aware of Darwin's most iconoclastic ideas almost ten years before they found print--a harbinger of the scientist's momentous dissolution of the great chain of being.
She has chosen her profession, a cetologist among other reasons because "it allowed her to be on her own, to have no fixed address, to be far from the familiar while still being a part of a loyal but loose knit community" (106).