chainplate

(redirected from chainplates)

chainplate

(ˈtʃeɪnˌpleɪt)
n
(Nautical Terms) a metal plate on the side of a vessel, to which the shrouds are attached
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The chainplates are also composite and fully laminated to the hull so they all have the same mechanical properties and create a single monolithic structure where everything works as one.
The biggest problems are metallic fasteners screwed or bolted through the dielectric shield to attach blocks, winches, stanchions, or chainplates. The differences in conductivity between the dielectric and the metallic fasteners such as screws, bolts, and rivets cause streamers to form at the fasteners and lightning leaders to be attracted to the metal.
This is obtained by using one material only (fiberglass), avoiding filler and silicone in the five key points: 50 mm composite main bulkhead resin bonded to the hull and most importantly of all to the deck; composite chainplates (instead of steel) vacuum bonded with 48 layers of uni--and bidirectional fibres; long tudinal, transverse and side girders are not an inner moulding construction, but are fully laminated and resin bonded to the hull; keel attachment provided with a 50 mm stainless steel AISI 316 mounting flange connected to the hull by means of no.
Don't get close to the shrouds/stays/ chainplates! Go below decks!
Outside shrouds with hull chainplates support the alloy rig, while up front the retractable prodder deploys for an asymmetric kite.
Outside shrouds with hull chainplates supports the alloy rig while up front the retractable prodder deploys for an asymmetric kite.
This B&R style design requires wide triangulation, so the three shrouds either side are located outboard on the gunwales with chainplates. This layout, with Genoa track inboard, leaves the deck nicely clear for working crew, though the wooden toerail won't be a comfortable hiking perch.
[] Run an eye over all the stainless steel gear--stanchions, pulpits, transoms, life rails, chainplates and cleats--for signs of wear and rust.
The jib-furler is out of sight, the chainplates are recessed, and all control lines run beneath mouldings.
If you trace a component rod strand from the point where it joins the chainplates, some will run to the top of the spar, others will run part way up the mast to form diagonals, however they all start from the same base point.
The chainplates are on the hull sides, and the hounds, where the cap shrouds meet the mast, are well down from the masthead so the shrouds meet the mast at a very oblique angle which can only be good for mast support.
The single lowers terminate at inboard chainplates; here, too, you find the lower end of the struts which meet and support the mast just above the gooseneck.