chaise

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chaise

 (shāz)
n.
1. Any of various light open carriages, often with a collapsible hood, especially a two-wheeled carriage drawn by one horse.
2. A post chaise.
3. A chaise longue.

[French, chair, variant of Old French chaiere; see chair.]

chaise

(ʃeɪz)
n
1. a light open horse-drawn carriage, esp one with two wheels designed for two passengers
3. (Historical Terms) a gold coin first issued in France in the 14th century, depicting the king seated on a throne
[C18: from French, variant of Old French chaiere chair]

chaise

(ʃeɪz)

n.
1. a light, open carriage, usu. with a hood, esp. a one-horse, two-wheeled carriage for two persons; shay.
3. a chaise longue, esp. a light one used out of doors.
[1695–1705; < French: chair, dial. alter. (with assibilation of -r-) of chaire chair]

Chaise

A light vehicle for personal transportation. Originally two-wheeled, and pulled by one horse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chaise - a long chairchaise - a long chair; for reclining    
chair - a seat for one person, with a support for the back; "he put his coat over the back of the chair and sat down"
2.chaise - a carriage consisting of two wheels and a calash top; drawn by a single horse
calash top, caleche, calash - the folding hood of a horse-drawn carriage
carriage, equipage, rig - a vehicle with wheels drawn by one or more horses
Translations

chaise

n (Hist) → Einspänner m
References in classic literature ?
It is always good for young people to be put upon exerting themselves; and you know, my dear Catherine, you always were a sad little scatter-brained creature; but now you must have been forced to have your wits about you, with so much changing of chaises and so forth; and I hope it will appear that you have not left anything behind you in any of the pockets.
Very nice four-wheel chaise, sir--seat for two behind--one in front for the gentleman that drives--oh
Giles popped out his nightcap again, preparatory to making some reply, when he was suddenly pulled back by a young gentleman who occupied the other corner of the chaise, and who eagerly demanded what was the news.
I mentioned to her at parting--I stood sufficiently in awe of her to put it off till the last moment--that Miserrimus Dexter had arranged to send his cousin and his pony-chaise to her residence on the next day; and I inquired thereupon whether my mother-in-law would permit me to call at her house to wait for the appearance of the cousin, or whether she would prefer sending the chaise on to Benjamin's cottage.
The old gentleman, the old lady, the pony, and the chaise, came up the street in perfect unanimity, until they arrived within some half a dozen doors of the Notary's house, when the pony, deceived by a brass-plate beneath a tailor's knocker, came to a halt, and maintained by a sturdy silence, that that was the house they wanted.
The road was a very good one; not at all a jolting road, or an uneven one; and yet Dolly held the side of the chaise with one little hand, all the way.
One of the men desisted and turned towards him, and my brother, realising from his an- tagonist's face that a fight was unavoidable, and being an expert boxer, went into him forthwith and sent him down against the wheel of the chaise.
Why, in passing through Lilliers you will send me your chaise, with an order to your servant to place himself at my disposal.
Pity and softened memory took place of the old antagonism, and in his busy thoughts about the future, as the chaise carried him rapidly along towards the home where he was now to be master, there was a continually recurring effort to remember anything by which he could show a regard for his grandfather's wishes, without counteracting his own cherished aims for the good of the tenants and the estate.
When I subsequently forced myself to consider it, the most distinct project I could frame for overcoming all difficulty was, to marry myself (the phrase is strictly descriptive of the Scotch ceremony) at the first inn we came to, over the Border; to hire a chaise, or take places in a public conveyance to Edinburgh, as a blind; to let Alicia and Mrs.
Now, if you take the chaise and go one road, and I borrow Swallow's chaise, and go the other, what with keeping our eyes open, and asking questions, one or other of us is pretty certain to lay hold of him.
Sedley," the Major said, "it's time to be off; the chaise will be at the door in half an hour.