chamberer

chamberer

(ˈtʃeɪmbərə)
n
1. archaic someone who attends to a bed chamber; chambermaid or chamberlain
2. censorious a lascivious person
References in periodicals archive ?
As was common among churchmen during this period, Bersuire eagerly sought benefices for their income, and after receiving several minor ones, in 1349, he was preferred to the important office of chamberer of Notre Dame de Colombes in the diocese of Chartres, bringing him closer to Paris, where he finally moved.
He tells them that they elect magistrates who "play the chamberer and the philosopher by turns--listen to bawdy songs at the Carnival and cry "'Bellisimi!'--and listen to sacred lauds and cry again 'Bellisimi!'" (61).
Othello spoke the following soliloquy: "This fellow's of exceeding honesty," where he laments being black, "having not those soft parts of conversation / That chamberers have," and being "declined / Into the vale of years" (274-95) while straddling the black stripe that now symbolized the rift between him and Desdemona.
(16) When in act 3 Othello verbalizes his insecurity, nagatively comparing himself with others on the status hierarchy, he articulates his insecurity in relation to his race and age: 'Haply, for I am black, and have not those soft parts of conversation / That chamberers have, or for that I am declined / Into the vale of years' (3.3.267-70).