chancery


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chan·cer·y

 (chăn′sə-rē)
n. pl. chan·cer·ies
1. Law
a. A court of chancery.
b. The proceedings and practice of a court of chancery; equity.
c. A court of public record; an office of archives.
d. One of the five divisions of the High Court of Justice of Great Britain, presided over by the Lord High Chancellor.
2. The office or department of a chancellor; a chancellery.

[Middle English chancerie, alteration of chancelrie; see chancellery.]

chancery

(ˈtʃɑːnsərɪ)
n, pl -ceries
1. (Law) Also called: Chancery Division (in England) the Lord Chancellor's court, now a division of the High Court of Justice
2. (Law) Also called: court of chancery (in the US) a court of equity
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Brit the political section or offices of an embassy or legation
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for chancellery
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a court of public records; archives
6. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a diocesan office under the supervision of a bishop's chancellor, having custody of archives, issuing official enactments, etc
7. (Law) law (of a suit) pending in a court of equity
8. (Wrestling) wrestling boxing (of a competitor's head) locked under an opponent's arm
[C14: shortened from chancellery]

chan•cer•y

(ˈtʃæn sə ri, ˈtʃɑn-)

n., pl. -cer•ies.
1. the office or department of a chancellor; chancellery.
2. an office of public records.
3. Brit. the Lord Chancellor's court, a division of the High Court of Justice.
4.
a. a court of equity.
5. the administrative office of a diocese.
[1325–75; Middle English chancerie, variant of chancelrie, syncopated variant of chancellerie chancellery]

chancery

The building upon a diplomatic or consular compound which houses the offices of the chief of mission or principal officer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chancery - a court with jurisdiction in equity
court, judicature, tribunal - an assembly (including one or more judges) to conduct judicial business
2.chancery - an office of archives for public or ecclesiastic records; a court of public records
archive - a depository containing historical records and documents
Translations

chancery

[ˈtʃɑːnsərɪ] N
1. (Brit) (Jur) (also Chancery Division) sala del High Court que se ocupa de causas de derecho privado
ward in chancery pupilo/a bajo la protección del tribunal
2. (US) = chancellery
3. (US) (Jur) (also Court of Chancery) → tribunal m de equidad

Chancery

[ˈtʃɑːnsəri] ncour f de la chancellerie

chancery

n ward in chanceryMündel ntin Amtsvormundschaft
References in classic literature ?
A Chancery judge once had the kindness to inform me, as one of a company of some hundred and fifty men and women not labouring under any suspicions of lunacy, that the Court of Chancery, though the shining subject of much popular prejudice (at which point I thought the judge's eye had a cast in my direction), was almost immaculate.
But as it is wholesome that the parsimonious public should know what has been doing, and still is doing, in this connexion, I mention here that everything set forth in these pages concerning the Court of Chancery is substantially true, and within the truth.
1] In New Jersey, there is a court of chancery which proceeds like ours, but neither courts of admiralty nor of probates, in the sense in which these last are established with us.
The simplicity and expedition which form the distinguishing characters of this mode of trial require that the matter to be decided should be reduced to some single and obvious point; while the litigations usual in chancery frequently comprehend a long train of minute and independent particulars.
She had made a success of her business, and now had an office in Chancery Lane; she did little typing herself, but spent her time correcting the work of the four girls she employed.
Whosoever had gone out of Fleet Street into the Temple at the date of this history, and had wandered disconsolate about the Temple until he stumbled on a dismal churchyard, and had looked up at the dismal windows commanding that churchyard until at the most dismal window of them all he saw a dismal boy, would in him have beheld, at one grand comprehensive swoop of the eye, the managing clerk, junior clerk, common-law clerk, conveyancing clerk, chancery clerk, every refinement and department of clerk, of Mr Mortimer Lightwood, erewhile called in the newspapers eminent solicitor.
and so forth, Court of Chancery having been moved, &c.
After that, we went into Chancery, where we are still, and where I shall always be.
In this case the office in Chancery Lane was the very first place which he and Sir Percival would cause to be watched, and if the same persons were chosen for the purpose who had been employed to follow me, before my departure from England, the fact of my return would in all probability be ascertained on that very day.
He was never seen on 'Change, nor at the Bank, nor in the counting-rooms of the "City"; no ships ever came into London docks of which he was the owner; he had no public employment; he had never been entered at any of the Inns of Court, either at the Temple, or Lincoln's Inn, or Gray's Inn; nor had his voice ever resounded in the Court of Chancery, or in the Exchequer, or the Queen's Bench, or the Ecclesiastical Courts.
IT is said that the world is in a state of bankruptcy; that the world owes the world more than the world can pay, and ought to go into chancery and be sold.
was in a little street off Chancery Lane, and he had to ask his way two or three times.