chancy

(redirected from chanciness)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

chanc·y

 (chăn′sē)
adj. chanc·i·er, chanc·i·est
1. Uncertain as to outcome; risky; hazardous.
2. Random; haphazard.
3. Scots Lucky; propitious.

chanc′i·ness n.

chancy

(ˈtʃɑːnsɪ) or

chancey

adj, chancier or chanciest
informal of uncertain outcome or temperament; risky
ˈchancily adv
ˈchanciness n

chanc•y

(ˈtʃæn si, ˈtʃɑn-)

adj. chanc•i•er, chanc•i•est.
1. hazardous or risky; uncertain.
2. subject to chance; random; haphazard.
3. Scot. lucky.
[1505–15]
chanc′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.chancy - of uncertain outcome; especially fraught with risk; "an extremely dicey future on a brave new world of liquid nitrogen, tar, and smog"- New Yorker
dangerous, unsafe - involving or causing danger or risk; liable to hurt or harm; "a dangerous criminal"; "a dangerous bridge"; "unemployment reached dangerous proportions"
2.chancy - subject to accident or chance or change; "a chancy appeal at best"; "getting that job was definitely fluky"; "a fluky wind"; "an iffy proposition"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
uncertain - not certain to occur; not inevitable; "everything is uncertain about the army"; "the issue is uncertain"

chancy

adjective (Informal) risky, dangerous, uncertain, dodgy (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. slang), hazardous, speculative, perilous, problematical, dicey (informal, chiefly Brit.) Investment is becoming a chancy business.
sure, sound, certain, safe, secure, stable, reliable

chancy

adjective
Translations
فيهِ مُجازَفَه، غَيْر مَضْمون
riskantní
óviss, tvísÿnn
risklisonu şüpheli

chancy

[ˈtʃɑːnsɪ] ADJ (chancier (compar) (chanciest (superl))) → arriesgado

chancy

[ˈtʃɑːnsi] adj (= risky) → risqué(e)

chancy

adj (+er) (inf: = risky) → riskant

chancy

chancey [ˈtʃɑːnsɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → rischioso/a

chance

(tʃaːns) noun
1. luck or fortune. It was by chance that I found out the truth.
2. an opportunity. Now you have a chance to do well.
3. a possibility. He has no chance of winning.
4. (a) risk. There's an element of chance in this business deal.
verb
1. to risk. I may be too late but I'll just have to chance it.
2. to happen accidentally or unexpectedly. I chanced to see him last week.
adjective
happening unexpectedly. a chance meeting.
ˈchancy adjective
risky or uncertain. a chancy arrangement.
chance on/upon
1. to meet by accident. I chanced on a friend of yours.
2. to discover by accident. I chanced upon some information.
by any chance
used in enquiring about the possibility of something. Are you by any chance free tonight?
by chance
by luck; without planning. They met by chance.
an even chance
equal probability for and against. We have an even chance of success.
the chances are
it is likely (that). The chances are he can't come tomorrow.
References in periodicals archive ?
In each of these discarded models, it is the fearsome chanciness of mortal luck that is to be exorcised at all costs--just as the chance at the heart of Darwinian evolutionary theory, as many critics said, emptied the world of the cosmic grandeur and solace for which tragedy was supposed, in their estimation, to stand.
Both may enhance the chanciness of any particular recruitment event relative to the apparent SSB supporting it.
Like Dante through the Pilgrim, Ferrante through Elena demonstrates that the uncertainties one experiences along the way to self-knowledge are universal, inevitable, and all too human because any story about people is replete with hesitancies, ambivalences, indecisions, and chanciness grounded in the fact that no human is ever completely knowable.
They often look to be highlighting, not downplaying, the chanciness that
could, or may, find the chanciness of life interesting or just plain
On the one side are those in the Wesleyan-Arminian and, more recently, open theistic and process traditions that have advocated a theological vision of divine providence working in and through the chanciness of creation's processes; on the other side are, usually, Reformed thinkers, especially conservative (often Westminster confessional) theologians, who have labored to insist on God's sovereignty sometimes despite but more often over the appearances of fortuitousness and haphazardness in the nature of things.
In any event, Downs may have possibly benefited earlier in the year from discussing his situation with an economist familiar with the national data, especially its pitfalls, and who would also be familiar with the chanciness of extrapolating from firm or local circumstances to national conditions.
Thus resistance to reason seems to be a permanent quality of the whole of things, shown in the chanciness of events--unintelligible--and the idiosyncratic aberrations of our minds--unintelligent.
The categorization of horse racing as a 'lucky game' also signified a particular way of constructing this gambling activity which emphasized unpredictability and chanciness over strategies and skills.
But where the case is really puzzling (which most un- "foredoomed" cases are) my suspicion is that this approach throws the ultimate decision into materially greater chanciness than does the tougher inquiry into which of the known permissible possibilities seems the probable best, and why [emphase dans l'original] (213).
To him, "tension means uncertainty, chanciness; a striving to decide the issue and so end it.
At the same time that they produce a sense of alienation, fragmentation, and "misapprehension" (understood as misapprehension, or the failure to apprehend, capture, or contain), multicultural cities like Toronto expose the fiction of individual self-containment and the chanciness of social relations, especially given that intergenerational relationships actually exceed the space of the city.