new moon

(redirected from change of the moon)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

new moon

n.
1. The phase of the moon at which the moon, as viewed from Earth, does not appear to be illuminated by the sun. The new phase marks the beginning of a single revolution of the moon around the earth.
2. The period of the month when such a moon occurs.

new moon

n
1. (Astronomy) the moon when it appears as a narrow waxing crescent
2. (Astronomy) the time at which this occurs
3. (Astronomy) astronomy one of the four principal phases of the moon, occurring when it lies between the earth and the sun

new′ moon′


n.
1. the moon either when in conjunction with the sun or soon after, being either invisible or visible only as a slender crescent.
2. the phase of the moon at this time.

new moon

(no͞o)
The phase of the moon that occurs when it passes between Earth and the sun, making it either invisible or visible only as a thin crescent at sunset. See more at moon. Compare full moon.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.new moon - the time at which the Moon appears as a narrow waxing crescentnew moon - the time at which the Moon appears as a narrow waxing crescent
month - a time unit of approximately 30 days; "he was given a month to pay the bill"
phase of the moon - a time when the Moon presents a particular recurring appearance
References in periodicals archive ?
Her 1999 novel, At the Full and Change of the Moon, tells the story of Marie Ursule, queen of a secret society of militant slaves in Trinidad.
Seguindo de forma similar o mote de Beloved, que se constroi por meio da progressiva narrativa da estoria de uma mae escrava que mata sua propria filha para livra-la da escravidao, tanto At the Full and Change of the Moon * quanto A Mercy * tambem partem da narracao, do relato de um traslado em busca de algo que serve de gatilho para a memoria, bem como de um crime que somente aos poucos ou mesmo ao final e revelado.
Coetzee, and cultural memory in Dionne Brand's At the Full and Change of the Moon. Zach is chair of English language and literature at the University of Innsbruck.
Reading Janice Kulyk Keefer as an author engaged in "writing ethnicity" (160), Lindy Ledohowski uses The Green Library (1991) to posit a specifically Ukrainian-Canadian Gothic; and, in a provocative essay that examines Monkey Beach, Ann-Marie MacDonald's Fall on Your Knees (1996), and Dionne Brand's At the Full and Change of the Moon (1999), Shelley Kulperger affirms a specifically feminist postcolonial Gothic that labours to materialize and familiarize conventional gothic tropes (98).
Much of her poetry, including No Language is Neutral, as well as her first two novels, In Another Place, Not Here and At the Full and Change of the Moon, dispute colonial constructions of language and the nation-state by creating space for bodies historically marked as "other." While Brand continues to be both political and poetic, What We All Long For is a departure from her previous work in the geography of place she creates and the many lenses she uses to narrate stories of love and longing.