changed


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change

 (chānj)
v. changed, chang·ing, chang·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to be different: change the spelling of a word.
b. To give a completely different form or appearance to; transform: changed the yard into a garden.
2. To give and receive reciprocally; interchange: change places.
3. To exchange for or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category: change one's name; a light that changes colors.
4.
a. To lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; switch: change methods; change sides.
b. To transfer from (one conveyance) to another: change planes.
5. To give or receive the equivalent of (money) in lower denominations or in foreign currency.
6. To put a fresh covering on: change a bed; change the baby.
v.intr.
1. To become different or undergo alteration: He changed as he matured.
2. To undergo transformation or transition: The music changed to a slow waltz.
3. To go from one phase to another, as the moon or the seasons.
4. To make an exchange: If you prefer this seat, I'll change with you.
5. To transfer from one conveyance to another: She changed in Chicago on her way to the coast.
6. To put on other clothing: We changed for dinner.
7. To become deeper in tone: His voice began to change at age 13.
n.
1. The act, process, or result of altering or modifying: a change in facial expression.
2. The replacing of one thing for another; substitution: a change of atmosphere; a change of ownership.
3. A transformation or transition from one state, condition, or phase to another: the change of seasons.
4. Something different; variety: ate early for a change.
5. A different or fresh set of clothing.
6.
a. Money of smaller denomination given or received in exchange for money of higher denomination.
b. The balance of money returned when an amount given is more than what is due.
c. Coins: had change jingling in his pocket.
7. Music
a. A pattern or order in which bells are rung.
b. In jazz, a change of harmony; a modulation.
8. A market or exchange where business is transacted.
Phrasal Verb:
change off
1. To alternate with another person in performing a task.
2. To perform two tasks at once by alternating or a single task by alternate means.
Idioms:
change hands
To pass from one owner to another.
change (one's) mind
To reverse a previously held opinion or an earlier decision.
change (one's) tune
To alter one's approach or attitude.

[Middle English changen, from Norman French chaunger, from Latin cambiāre, cambīre, to exchange, probably of Celtic origin.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.changed - made or become different in nature or form; "changed attitudes"; "changed styles of dress"; "a greatly changed country after the war"
unchanged - not made or become different; "the causes that produced them have remained unchanged"
2.changed - made or become different in some respect; "he's an altered (or changed) man since his election to Congress"
altered - changed in form or character without becoming something else; "the altered policy promised success"; "following an altered course we soon found ourselves back in civilization"; "he looked...with clouded eyes and with an altered manner of breathing"- Charles Dickens
3.changed - changed in constitution or structure or composition by metamorphism; "metamorphic rocks"
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
metamorphic - characterized by metamorphosis or change in physical form or substance
Translations
References in classic literature ?
In the first case, you say that it is not he who has changed, but your eyes; in the second, you say that he has changed.
If the appearances from sufficiently neighbouring places are either wholly un changed, or changed to a diminishing extent which has zero for its limit, it is usually found that the changes can be accounted for by changes in objects which are between the object in question and the places from which its appearance has changed appreciably.
But a man is not often found sufficiently circumspect to know how to accommodate himself to the change, both because he cannot deviate from what nature inclines him to do, and also because, having always prospered by acting in one way, he cannot be persuaded that it is well to leave it; and, therefore, the cautious man, when it is time to turn adventurous, does not know how to do it, hence he is ruined; but had he changed his conduct with the times fortune would not have changed.
Then as he changed, the tales he listened to changed too.
You have raised your voices in an unmistakable chorus, you have cast your votes in historic numbers, you have changed the face of congress, the presidency, and the political process itself.
The tremendous catastrophe which had befallen Tom had changed his moral landscape in much the same way.
Let it be enough to say that the time when she first surprised my secret was, I firmly believe, the time when she first surprised her own, and the time, also, when she changed towards me in the interval of one night.
When she had learnt enough she took my son into a distant place and changed him into a calf.
Clearly, he said, that must be the case if he is changed at all.
She had changed her gown for a house dress as fresh and elegant as the other.
The government too of Epidamnus was changed from a quarrel that arose from an intended marriage; for a certain man having contracted his daughter in marriage, the father of the young person to whom she was contracted, being archon, punishes him, upon which account he, resenting the affront, associated himself with those who were excluded from any share in the government, and brought about a revolution.
He could not help starting, which so changed the position of his nose as to bring the "pyramid" pell-mell upon the stage.