channel airlift

channel airlift

Common-user airlift service provided on a scheduled basis between two points. There are two types of channel airlift. A requirements channel serves two or more points on a scheduled basis depending upon the volume of traffic; a frequency channel is time-based and serves two or more points at regular intervals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cargo traveling to remote locations not served by channel airlift or traveling between scheduled channel flights could typically benefit from a SAAM.
This research therefore accomplishes an exploratory case study methodology comparing a snapshot (February 2004) of the channel airlift system servicing Iraq to a notional channel airlift routing system constructed using a regional hub heuristic.
The first portion of objective 1 was to understand the nature of US Central Command's (USCENTCOM) channel airlift system, the scheduled theater airlift routing system (STARS), during the period of study.
However, conclusions reached in this study do put forward the possibility that a more effective, efficient, simpler channel system (STARS) may increase use of channel airlift, thus supplanting requirements for demand-triggered airlift.
Major topics focus on the hub-and-spoke background, Iraq's channel airlift system (STARS), and a discussion of each of the dependent variables (efficiency, effectiveness, and simplicity).
Describing the Iraqi channel airlift system requires an explanation of the organizational structure which produces, monitors, and executes intratheater channel airlift.
Channel airlift consists of a variety of routes, made up of one or more legs, flown on a scheduled basis to meet recurring, predictable demand on a requirements or frequency basis.
This example illustrates use of channel airlift to meet a level of recurring demand at a given level of efficiency, augmented by demand-triggered airlift to achieve effectiveness.
These channel airlift missions, which are designated to carry DoD cargo, are prioritized as 1B1, 1B3, or 3A3.
It assessed the Air Mobility Command's channel airlift business model and its ability to adjust to the Future Logistics Enterprise initiative.
Upon receipt of the delivery, MARFORLANT Traffic Management Officer Major Deb Anderson arranged for the 1,800 pairs to be shipped to the Marine Expeditionary Unit Services Support Group (MSSG) 22, and 3,756 pairs to the Logistics Officer Commander Marine Corps Central Command via Air Mobility Command channel airlift to Bahrain, and the remaining 1,800 pairs to MSSG-24 Camp Lejeune via local freight carrier.
Military Air Lines of Communication is a similar system used primarily by the Army, except it uses military channel airlift instead of commercial aircraft (Figure 2).