chant


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Related to chant: Gregorian chant

chant

 (chănt)
n.
1.
a. A series of syllables or words that are sung on or intoned to the same note or a limited range of notes.
b. A canticle or prayer sung or intoned in this manner.
2. A monotonous rhythmic call or shout, as of a slogan: the chant of the crowd at the rally.
v. chant·ed, chant·ing, chants
v.tr.
1. To sing or intone to a chant: chant a prayer.
2. To celebrate in song: chanting a hero's deeds.
3. To say in the manner of a chant: chanted defiant slogans.
v.intr.
1. To sing, especially in the manner of a chant: chanted while a friend jumped rope.
2. To speak monotonously.

[Probably from French, song, from Old French, from Latin cantus, from past participle of canere, to sing. V., from Middle English chaunten, to sing, from Old French chanter, from Latin cantāre, frequentative of canere; see kan- in Indo-European roots.]

chant′ing·ly adv.

chant

(tʃɑːnt)
n
1. (Music, other) a simple song or melody
2. (Music, other) a short simple melody in which several words or syllables are assigned to one note, as in the recitation of psalms
3. (Music, other) a psalm or canticle performed by using such a melody
4. a rhythmic or repetitious slogan, usually spoken or sung, as by sports supporters, etc
5. monotonous or singsong intonation in speech
vb
6. (Music, other) to sing or recite (a psalm, prayer, etc) as a chant
7. to intone (a slogan) rhythmically or repetitiously
8. to speak or say monotonously as if intoning a chant
[C14: from Old French chanter to sing, from Latin cantāre, frequentative of canere to sing]
ˈchanting n, adj
ˈchantingly adv

chant

(tʃænt, tʃɑnt)

n.
1. a short, simple melody, esp. the monodic intonation of plainsong.
2. a psalm, canticle, or the like, chanted or for chanting.
3. a song; singing: the chant of a bird.
4. a phrase, slogan, or the like, repeated rhythmically and insistently, as by a crowd.
v.t.
5. to sing to a chant, or in the manner of a chant, esp. in a church service.
6. to repeat (a phrase, slogan, etc.) rhythmically and insistently.
v.i.
7. to utter a chant.
[1350–1400; (v.) Middle English < Middle French chanter < Latin cantāre, frequentative of canere to sing; (n.) < French chant, Old French < Latin cantus; see canto]
chant′a•ble, adj.

chant


Past participle: chanted
Gerund: chanting

Imperative
chant
chant
Present
I chant
you chant
he/she/it chants
we chant
you chant
they chant
Preterite
I chanted
you chanted
he/she/it chanted
we chanted
you chanted
they chanted
Present Continuous
I am chanting
you are chanting
he/she/it is chanting
we are chanting
you are chanting
they are chanting
Present Perfect
I have chanted
you have chanted
he/she/it has chanted
we have chanted
you have chanted
they have chanted
Past Continuous
I was chanting
you were chanting
he/she/it was chanting
we were chanting
you were chanting
they were chanting
Past Perfect
I had chanted
you had chanted
he/she/it had chanted
we had chanted
you had chanted
they had chanted
Future
I will chant
you will chant
he/she/it will chant
we will chant
you will chant
they will chant
Future Perfect
I will have chanted
you will have chanted
he/she/it will have chanted
we will have chanted
you will have chanted
they will have chanted
Future Continuous
I will be chanting
you will be chanting
he/she/it will be chanting
we will be chanting
you will be chanting
they will be chanting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chanting
you have been chanting
he/she/it has been chanting
we have been chanting
you have been chanting
they have been chanting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chanting
you will have been chanting
he/she/it will have been chanting
we will have been chanting
you will have been chanting
they will have been chanting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chanting
you had been chanting
he/she/it had been chanting
we had been chanting
you had been chanting
they had been chanting
Conditional
I would chant
you would chant
he/she/it would chant
we would chant
you would chant
they would chant
Past Conditional
I would have chanted
you would have chanted
he/she/it would have chanted
we would have chanted
you would have chanted
they would have chanted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chant - a repetitive song in which as many syllables as necessary are assigned to a single tonechant - a repetitive song in which as many syllables as necessary are assigned to a single tone
Gregorian chant, plainchant, plainsong - a liturgical chant of the Roman Catholic Church
religious song - religious music for singing
Verb1.chant - recite with musical intonation; recite as a chant or a psalm; "The rabbi chanted a prayer"
singsong - speak, chant, or declaim in a singsong
sing - produce tones with the voice; "She was singing while she was cooking"; "My brother sings very well"
2.chant - utter monotonously and repetitively and rhythmically; "The students chanted the same slogan over and over again"
mouth, speak, talk, verbalise, verbalize, utter - express in speech; "She talks a lot of nonsense"; "This depressed patient does not verbalize"

chant

noun
1. cry, call, song, shout, slogan They taunted their rivals with the chant, `You're not singing any more.'
2. song, carol, chorus, melody, psalm We were listening to a CD of Gregorian chant.
verb
1. shout, call, sing The demonstrators chanted slogans at the police.
2. sing, chorus, recite, intone, carol Muslims chanted and prayed in the temple.

chant

verb
To utter words or sounds in musical tones:
Archaic: tune.
Translations
تَرْتيل، تَرْنيمَههُتاف، تَكْراريُرَتِّلُ، يُكَرِّرُ، يَهْتِفُيُرتـل، يُنشد
chvalozpěvskandovánískandovatzpěvavě odříkávat
messeslagord
énekelskandálszlogen
baráttufrasi, slagorîsálmasöngursöngla, staglast ásyngja, tóna
giedotiskanduotišūkis
dziedātdziesmamonotona skandēšanapsalmu dziedāšanaskandēt
monotónne odriekaťskandovanieskandovaťspev žalmov
ilâhiokumaksloganslogan atmaksöylemek

chant

[tʃɑːnt]
A. N (Mus, Rel) → canto m; [of crowd] → grito m, consigna f (fig) (monotonous) → sonsonete m
plain chant (Rel) → canto m llano
B. VT (Mus, Rel) → cantar; [+ slogan] → gritar (rítmicamente), corear (fig) → salmodiar, recitar en tono monótono
C. VI (Mus, Rel) → cantar; (at demonstration etc) → gritar (rítmicamente)

chant

[ˈtʃɑːnt]
n
[fans] → chant m; [demonstrators] → slogans mpl
[priests, worshippers] → psalmodie f
vt
[+ slogan, name] → scander
The demonstrators chanted their disapproval
BUT Les manifestants criaient leur mécontentement.
[+ prayer, mantra] → psalmodier

chant

n (Eccl, Mus) → Gesang m, → Cantus m; (= monotonous song)Sprechgesang m, → Singsang m; (of football fans etc)Sprechchor m; tribal chantsStammesgesänge pl
vtim (Sprech)chor rufen; (Eccl) → singen
viSprechchöre anstimmen; (Eccl) → singen

chant

[tʃɑːnt]
1. n (of crowd) → slogan m inv (Rel, Mus) → canto, salmodia
2. vt (Rel, Mus) → cantare; (subj, crowd) the demonstrators chanted their disapprovali dimostranti lanciavano slogan di protesta
3. vi (see vt) → cantare, salmodiare, lanciare slogan

chant

(tʃaːnt) verb
1. to recite in a singing manner. The monks were chanting their prayers.
2. to repeat (a phrase, slogan etc) over and over out loud. The crowd was chanting `We want more!'
noun
1. a kind of sacred song.
2. a phrase or slogan constantly repeated. `Stop the cuts!' was the chant.
References in classic literature ?
When the chants came on one of her favourites happened to be chosen among the rest--the old double chant "Langdon"--but she did not know what it was called, though she would much have liked to know.
These venerable gentlemen, who I presume were the priests, kept up an uninterrupted monotonous chant, which was partly drowned in the roar of drums.
Placebo is the first word of the first chant in the service for the dead.
Her perfect arm pressed Tarzan closer to her--a smile parted her lips and then she awoke, and slowly the smile faded and her eyes went wide in horror as the significance of the death chant impinged upon her understanding.
It was while bending over them, examining, that again he heard the eery chant.
We ran through a long list of prohibitions, and then the chant swung round to a new formula.
Mr Quilp was certainly entertaining himself with vocal exercise, but it was rather a kind of chant than a song; being a monotonous repetition of one sentence in a very rapid manner, with a long stress upon the last word, which he swelled into a dismal roar.
This naturally led to racing, and shooting at a mark; one trial of speed and skill succeeded another, shouts and acclamations rose from the victorious parties, fierce altercations succeeded, and a general melee was about to take place, when suddenly the attention of the quarrellers was arrested by a strange kind of Indian chant or chorus, that seemed to operate upon them as a charm.
One chant only he raised, though he remembered no more than the first stanza and but three lines of that.
They paddled on up the river, the dusky Indians now and then breaking out into a chant that seemed to give their muscles new energy.
On each side of the choir and behind the gratings opening into the convent was assembled the whole community of the Carmelites, who listened to the divine service, and mingled their chant with the chant of the priests, without seeing the profane, or being seen by them.
As the immediate effect, however, gradually passed away, a low murmur of voices commenced a sort of chant in honor of the dead.