chantress

chantress

(ˈtʃɑːntrəs) or

chauntress

n
a female chanter or singer
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In adopting the role of the chantress (the regular meter a
One of the complete coffins on display is the cartonnage mummy case for the chantress Shebmut, dated to between 945-715 BC; it is representative of the careful and meticulous work that the artisans put into such items, particularly in the painting of hieroglyphs and deities.
This is the sequel to Chantress Alchemy (Simon & Schuster, 2014/VOYA August 2014) and Chantress (Simon & Schuster, 2013).
We're flying in superstar singer Brian Kennedy and chantress Una Dunne from Ireland and a couple of ace Newcastle United footballers Super-Mac and Olivier Bernard will pop in for a turn along with local comedian John Scott.
As a chantress of the god Amun, the nubile beauty with her dark, flowing locks would have been revered by the lucky few who got to see her gigs at the Temple of Karnak in Egypt.
The day will include family-friendly, but historically accurate, things to do, including "Make Your Own Viking Shield" (all day), "Playing Viking Games" (all day), "Women in Viking Times" (11:30 a.m.), "Vikings in Arms" (12:15 p.m.), "Tales of the Chantress" (12:30 p.m.), "Prophecy of the Seeress" (1 p.m.) and a "Viking Warrior Presentation" (2 p.m.).
By SHERYL FRANCES CHEN, O.C.S.O., chantress and Saturday cook at Tautra Mariakloster, Norway (tautra.no).
Her titles, "Lady of the House" and "Chantress of Amun" suggest that her family owned property.
The mummy of Perenbast, a chantress from a temple near Luxor, is fully wrapped in cloth and the decorative tomb is worth seeing.
For the most part, this was a male-dominated bureaucracy, with women filling only minor positions, such as chantress of Amun, but there were exceptions, offices held by women who wielded great power.
For much of her adult life, Mechtild was the convent's chantress, in charge of liturgical celebration and responsible for leading the nuns' chant in the divine office.
The duties of the remaining officers (chantress, infirmaria, cellaress, wardrober, portress) are outlined only in relation to their obedience to the deaconess, that is, without any reference to any direct relationship with the abbot.