chants


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chants

psalms, canticles, or songs that are sung in a rhythmic, monotonous tone: chants of a bird
Not to be confused with:
chance – luck or fortune; a risk or hazard; accident; fortuity: We meet, not really by chance.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

chant

 (chănt)
n.
1.
a. A series of syllables or words that are sung on or intoned to the same note or a limited range of notes.
b. A canticle or prayer sung or intoned in this manner.
2. A monotonous rhythmic call or shout, as of a slogan: the chant of the crowd at the rally.
v. chant·ed, chant·ing, chants
v.tr.
1. To sing or intone to a chant: chant a prayer.
2. To celebrate in song: chanting a hero's deeds.
3. To say in the manner of a chant: chanted defiant slogans.
v.intr.
1. To sing, especially in the manner of a chant: chanted while a friend jumped rope.
2. To speak monotonously.

[Probably from French, song, from Old French, from Latin cantus, from past participle of canere, to sing. V., from Middle English chaunten, to sing, from Old French chanter, from Latin cantāre, frequentative of canere; see kan- in Indo-European roots.]

chant′ing·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
When the chants came on one of her favourites happened to be chosen among the rest--the old double chant "Langdon"--but she did not know what it was called, though she would much have liked to know.
In moments of happiness, exaltation, or battle, he was prone to burst out in wild barbaric songs or chants. It was by this means that he located in time and space that strayed half of him who should have been dead and dust for thousands of years.
These venerable gentlemen, who I presume were the priests, kept up an uninterrupted monotonous chant, which was partly drowned in the roar of drums.
*Placebo is the first word of the first chant in the service for the dead.
During the balance of the day the priests of Opar were busy erecting an altar in the center of the clearing, and while they worked they chanted weird hymns in the ancient tongue of that lost continent that lies at the bottom of the Atlantic.
We ran through a long list of prohibitions, and then the chant swung round to a new formula.
Mr Quilp was certainly entertaining himself with vocal exercise, but it was rather a kind of chant than a song; being a monotonous repetition of one sentence in a very rapid manner, with a long stress upon the last word, which he swelled into a dismal roar.
This naturally led to racing, and shooting at a mark; one trial of speed and skill succeeded another, shouts and acclamations rose from the victorious parties, fierce altercations succeeded, and a general melee was about to take place, when suddenly the attention of the quarrellers was arrested by a strange kind of Indian chant or chorus, that seemed to operate upon them as a charm.
One chant only he raised, though he remembered no more than the first stanza and but three lines of that.
Down he sank in a chair--ran his hands through his hair-- And chanted in mimsiest tones Words whose utter inanity proved his insanity, While he rattled a couple of bones.
Another thought that a scarlet mole should be buried alive in the public park and a suitable incantation chanted over the remains.
They paddled on up the river, the dusky Indians now and then breaking out into a chant that seemed to give their muscles new energy.