chaplain

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chap·lain

 (chăp′lĭn)
n.
1. A member of the clergy attached to a chapel.
2.
a. A member of the clergy who conducts religious services for an institution, such as a prison or hospital.
b. A lay person who is appointed to provide spiritual leadership and counseling to members of an institution, as at a university.
c. A member of the clergy who is connected with a royal court or an aristocratic household.
3. A member of the clergy attached to a branch of the armed forces.

[Middle English chapelein, from Old French chapelain, from Medieval Latin capellānus, from capella, chapel; see chapel.]

chap′lain·cy, chap′lain·ship′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chaplain

(ˈtʃæplɪn)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a Christian clergyman attached to a private chapel of a prominent person or institution or ministering to a military body, professional group, etc: a military chaplain; a prison chaplain.
[C12: from Old French chapelain, from Late Latin cappellānus, from cappella chapel]
ˈchaplaincy, ˈchaplainˌship, ˈchaplainry n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chap•lain

(ˈtʃæp lɪn)

n.
1. an ecclesiastic associated with the chapel of a royal court, college, or military unit.
2. a person who says the prayer, invocation, etc., for an organization or at an assembly.
[1100–50; Middle English chapeleyn, late Old English capelein < Old North French, Old French < Medieval Latin cappellānus, orig. custodian of St. Martin's cloak (see chapel, -an1)]
chap′lain•cy, chap′lain•ship`, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chaplain - a clergyman ministering to some institutionchaplain - a clergyman ministering to some institution
prison chaplain - a chaplain in a prison
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
hospital chaplain - a chaplain in a hospital
Holy Joe, military chaplain, padre, sky pilot - a chaplain in one of the military services
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kaplanvojenský kněz
kappalainen
káplán
prestur
kapelionas
kapelāns
vojenský kňaz
…papazı

chaplain

[ˈtʃæplɪn] Ncapellán m
chaplain general (Mil) → vicario m general castrense
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

chaplain

[ˈtʃæplɪn] naumônier m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

chaplain

nKaplan m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

chaplain

[ˈtʃæplɪn] ncappellano
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

chaplain

(ˈtʃӕplin) noun
a clergyman attached to a ship, regiment etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

chaplain

n capellán m, sacerdote m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Enriquez announced that the Camillian Fathers have chaplaincies available for counseling.
It is also an opportunity for us to do pastoral visitations of our two Filipino chaplaincies in Nice and Paris, France," said Santos.
That diversity reflects a national trend toward multifaith chaplaincies and religious life offices at U.S.
She notes that while some chaplaincies such as Roman Catholic and fundamentalist Protestant are often well funded, that is not the case for the mainline services that share the university's code of ethics and can therefore fully support campus programs such as women's health.
This whole area is recognised in our hospitals through the provision of chaplaincies and, last week, the chaplaincy service opened its new Faith and Community Centre at the impressive Queen Elizabeth Hospital.