chaps


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chaps

 (chăps, shăps)
pl.n.
Leg coverings of leather or another durable material, worn usually over trousers, as by ranch hands or loggers, to protect the legs while working.

[Short for American Spanish chaparreras, from Spanish chaparro, chaparral; see chaparral.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chaps

(tʃæps; ʃæps)
pl n
(Clothing & Fashion) leather overalls without a seat, worn by cowboys. Also called: chaparejos or chaparajos
[C19: shortened from chaparejos]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chaps

(tʃæps, ʃæps)

n. (used with a pl. v.)
sturdy trouserlike leather leggings, often widely flared, worn over work pants, typically by cowboys.
[1810–20, Amer.; short for chaparajos]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

chaps

[tʃæps] NPL (US) → zahones mpl, chaparreras fpl
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

chaps

pllederne Reithosen pl, → Cowboyhosen pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
no matter though, i know many chaps that hav'n't got any, --good luck to 'em; and they are all the better off for it.
Some of these old misers hold on to every thing till they die, fancying it a mighty pleasant matter to chaps that can't support themselves to support THEIR daughters by industry, as they call it.
Now 'twas just here last June, as we was a- driving up the first-day boys, they was mendin' a quarter-mile of road, and there was a lot of Irish chaps, reg'lar roughs, a- breaking stones.
"Any'ow--got me out of the way of them Japanesy chaps. Wouldn't
"What did they do, all the chaps I knew, the chaps in the clubs with whom I'd been cheek by jowl for heaven knows how long?
If a chap gives me one black eye, that's enough for me; I sha'n't ax him for another afore I sarve him out; an' a good turn's worth as much as a bad un, anyhow.
'That chap, sir,' said John, taking it out again after a time, and pointing at him with the stem, 'though he's got all his faculties about him--bottled up and corked down, if I may say so, somewheres or another--'
He has been coming over to Europe now and then, and though he was a good, steady chap enough, he liked his fling when he was over here, and between you and me, he was the greatest crank I ever struck.
"Look at that chap!" said Rosser in a low voice, his eyes fixed upon the stranger.
"All a chap's got to do to make 'em thrive, mother," he would say, "is to be friends with 'em for sure.
"I say, Pip, old chap!" cried Joe, opening his blue eyes wide, "what a scholar you are!
I'm not a particular chap, wasn't brought up to it - no, nor squeamish either, but this is a bit thicker than anything I've ever knocked up against.