charade


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cha·rade

 (shə-rād′)
n.
1. Games
a. charades(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A game in which words or phrases are represented in pantomime, sometimes syllable by syllable, until they are guessed by the other players.
b. An episode in this game or a word or phrase so represented.
2. A readily perceived pretense; a travesty: went through the charade of a public apology.

[French, probably from Provençal charrado, chat, from charra, to chat, chatter, perhaps from Italian ciarlare.]

charade

(ʃəˈrɑːd)
n
1. (Games, other than specified) an episode or act in the game of charades
2. chiefly Brit an absurd act; travesty

cha•rade

(ʃəˈreɪd; esp. Brit. ʃəˈrɑd)

n.
1. charades, (used with a sing. v.) a game in which players act out in pantomime a word, phrase, title, etc., often syllable by syllable, for members of their team to guess.
2. a word or phrase acted out in pantomime.
3. a blatant pretense or deception; travesty.
[1770–80; < French < Occitan charrado entertainment =charr(á) to chat, chatter (of expressive orig.) + -ado -ade1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.charade - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous waycharade - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
2.charade - a word acted out in an episode of the game of charades
charades - player acts out a phrase for others to guess
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"

charade

noun pretence, farce, parody, pantomime, fake They went through an elaborate charade of pretending they had never met before.

charade

noun
The presentation of something false as true:
Translations
تَظاهُر هَزَلي مَكْشوف
parodie
paradenummer
látaleikur, skopstæling
akivaizdi apgaulėšarada
farss

charade

[ʃəˈrɑːd] N (frm, pej) → payasada f, farsa f charades (= game) → charada f

charade

[ʃəˈrɑːd]
n (= pretence) → mascarade f
to be a charade → être une mascarade charades
npl (= game) → charades fpl

charade

nScharade f; (fig)Farce f, → Affentheater nt (inf)

charade

[ʃəˈrɑːd] n
a. (pretence) → farsa
b. charades npl (game) → sciarada fsg

charade

(ʃəˈraːd) , ((American) ʃəˈreid) noun
a piece of ridiculous pretence which is so obvious that it does not deceive anyone.
chaˈrades noun singular
a game in which each syllable of a word, and then the whole word, is acted and the audience has to guess the word.
References in classic literature ?
They owed to him their two or three politest puzzles; and the joy and exultation with which at last he recalled, and rather sentimentally recited, that wellknown charade,
He called for a few moments, just to leave a piece of paper on the table containing, as he said, a charade, which a friend of his had addressed to a young lady, the object of his admiration, but which, from his manner, Emma was immediately convinced must be his own.
A portion of that splendid room, the picture gallery of Gaunt House, was arranged as the charade theatre.
Rawdon Crawley, who is going to act in the charade, comes forward and compliments Mrs.
So everyone but Mac, the gay Westerner, and Rose, took their places on the rocky seats and discussed the late beautiful and varied charade, in which Pokey frankly pronounced her own scene the "bestest of all.
As soon as the merry meal and a brief interval of repose were over, it was unanimously voted to have some charades.
exclaimed Colonel Dent, and the charade was solved.
Badger, speaking of her former husbands as if they were parts of a charade, "I still enjoyed opportunities of observing youth.
And yet people do not get hanged or run through the body for the sake of a charade.
Such disappointments only gave greater zest to the nights when we acted charades, or had a costume ball in the back parlour, with Sally always dressed like a boy.
They had never, I think, wanted to do so many things for their poor protectress; I mean--though they got their lessons better and better, which was naturally what would please her most-- in the way of diverting, entertaining, surprising her; reading her passages, telling her stories, acting her charades, pouncing out at her, in disguises, as animals and historical characters, and above all astonishing her by the "pieces" they had secretly got by heart and could interminably recite.
The acting of charades was tried on several evenings by the young gentlemen and ladies, in the cabins, and proved the most distinguished success of all the amusement experiments.