charging


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charge

 (chärj)
v. charged, charg·ing, charg·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To impose a duty, responsibility, or obligation on: charged him with the task of watching the young swimmers.
b. To instruct or urge authoritatively; command: charged her not to reveal the source of information.
c. Law To instruct (a jury) about the law, its application, and the weighing of evidence.
2. To set or ask (a given amount) as a price: charges ten dollars for a haircut.
3. To hold financially liable; demand payment from: charged her for the balance due.
4. To purchase on credit: paid cash for the stockings but charged the new coat.
5.
a. To load to capacity; fill: charge a furnace with coal.
b. To load (a gun or other firearm) with a quantity of explosive: charged the musket with powder.
c. To pervade or fill, as with a feeling or quality: The atmosphere was charged with tension.
6.
a. To make a claim of wrongdoing against; accuse or blame: The prosecutors charged him with car theft. Critics charged the writer with a lack of originality.
b. To put the blame for; attribute or impute: charged the accident to the driver's inexperience.
7. To rush against in an attack: The troops charged the enemy line.
8.
a. Basketball To bump or run into (a defender) illegally while in possession of the ball or having just made a pass or shot.
b. Sports To bump (an opponent) so as to knock off balance or gain control of the ball, as in soccer.
c. Sports To body-check (an opponent) illegally, from behind or after taking more than two strides, especially in ice hockey.
9. Electricity
a. To cause formation of a net electric charge on or in (a conductor, for example).
b. To energize (a storage battery) by passing current through it in the direction opposite to discharge.
10. To excite; rouse: a speaker who knows how to charge up a crowd.
11. To direct or put (a weapon) into position for use; level or direct.
12. Heraldry To place a charge on (an escutcheon).
v.intr.
1.
a. To rush forward in an attack: The dog charged at the intruder.
b. To rush forward; run: children charging around the house.
2. To demand or ask payment: did not charge for the second cup of coffee.
3. To make a purchase or purchases on credit.
4. Accounting To consider or record as a loss. Often used with off.
5. To become energized: The battery is still charging.
n.
1.
a. Expense; cost: added to the bill a charge for replacing the thermostat.
b. The price asked for something: What's the charge for a new tire?
c. A debt or an entry in an account recording a debt: Are you paying cash or is this a charge?
d. A financial burden, such as a tax or lien.
2.
a. A weight or burden; a load: a freighter relieved of its charge of cargo.
b. The quantity that a container or apparatus can hold.
3. A quantity of explosive to be set off at one time.
4.
a. An assigned duty or task; a responsibility: The commission's charge was to determine the facts.
b. Care; custody: a child put in my charge.
c. Supervision; management: the scientist who had overall charge of the research project. See Synonyms at care.
d. One that is entrusted to another's care or management: the baby sitter's three young charges.
5.
a. An order, command, or injunction.
b. Instruction given by a judge to a jury about the law, its application, and the weighing of evidence.
6. A claim of wrongdoing; an accusation: a charge of murder; pleaded not guilty to the charges.
7.
a. A rushing, forceful attack: repelled the charge of enemy troops; the charge of a herd of elephants.
b. The command to attack: The bugler sounded the charge.
8. Symbol qPhysics
a. The intrinsic property of matter responsible for all electric phenomena, in particular for the electromagnetic force, occurring in two forms arbitrarily designated negative and positive.
b. The net measure of this property possessed by a body or contained in a bounded region of space. Also called electric charge.
9. Physics
10. Informal A feeling of pleasant excitement; a thrill: got a real charge out of the movie.
11. Heraldry A figure or device represented on the field of an escutcheon.
Idioms:
in charge
1. In a position of leadership or supervision: the security agent in charge at the airport.
2. Chiefly British Under arrest.
in charge of
Having control over or responsibility for: You're in charge of making the salad.

[Middle English chargen, to load, from Old French chargier, from Late Latin carricāre, from Latin carrus, Gallic type of wagon, of Celtic origin; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

charging


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A player deliberately pushing an opposition player out of the way when playing the ball.
Translations

charging

[ˈtʃɑːdʒɪŋ] n (Phys) → elettrizzazione f
References in classic literature ?
Of all we'pons," he commenced, "the long barreled, true- grooved, soft-metaled rifle is the most dangerous in skillful hands, though it wants a strong arm, a quick eye, and great judgment in charging, to put forth all its beauties.
Every year there were scandals and investigations in this institution, the newspapers charging that doctors were allowed to try fantastic experiments upon the patients; but Jurgis knew nothing of this--his only complaint was that they used to feed him upon tinned meat, which no man who had ever worked in Packingtown would feed to his dog.
At the point which I had reached in a preceding paragraph of this account, the situation was as follows: two horses lay dying; the bull had scattered his persecutors for the moment, and stood raging, panting, pawing the dust in clouds over his back, when the man that had been wounded returned to the ring on a remount, a poor blindfolded wreck that yet had something ironically military about his bearing - and the next moment the bull had ripped him open and his bowls were dragging upon the ground: and the bull was charging his swarm of pests again.
But tell me--why did you charge him more than you are charging me?
We used to hop out of the woods and go charging down on hog-drivers and women in carts taking garden stuff to market, but we never hived any of them.
His man drove as if he were charging an enemy, and the furious recklessness of the man brought no check into the face, or to the lips, of the master.
Creakle had not preferred his claim to being a Tartar without reason; that he was the sternest and most severe of masters; that he laid about him, right and left, every day of his life, charging in among the boys like a trooper, and slashing away, unmercifully.
There I was, on Joe's back, and there was Joe beneath me, charging at the ditches like a hunter, and stimulating Mr.
We must both have cried out aloud when our eyes met, but while mine was the shrill cry of terror, his was a roar of fury like a charging bully's.
I drew it out, and at his desire, as well as I could, expressed to him the use of it; and charging it only with powder, which, by the closeness of my pouch, happened to escape wetting in the sea (an inconvenience against which all prudent mariners take special care to provide,) I first cautioned the emperor not to be afraid, and then I let it off in the air.
All preparations for the journey were now pressed forwards, and when all was ready the king accompanied the travellers for some days, after which he took an affectionate leave of his daughter, and charging the prince to take every care of her, returned to his capital.
At length, when I was within a few days' journey of the viceroy, I received a billet in more plain and express terms than anything I had been told yet, charging me with extreme imprudence in putting myself into the hands of those men who had undoubtedly sworn to cut me off.