charlatanry


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Related to charlatanry: charlatanism, Charlitain

char·la·tan

 (shär′lə-tən)
n.
A person who makes elaborate, fraudulent, and often voluble claims to skill or knowledge; a quack or fraud.

[French, from Italian ciarlatano, probably alteration (influenced by ciarlare, to prattle) of cerretano, inhabitant of Cerreto, a city of Italy once famous for its quacks.]

char′la·tan′ic (-tăn′ĭk), char′la·tan′i·cal adj.
char′la·tan·ism, char′la·tan·ry n.
References in classic literature ?
With my egotism, my charlatanry, my tongue, and my habit of having my own way, I am fit for no calling but that of saviour of mankind--just of the sort they like.
More than half self-hypnotized into a belief in his own charlatanry he faced this new demon who threatened to undermine his ancient and lucrative profession.
At the same time, the marvels of science are approached with a certain degree of suspicion: time and again, the interlocutors discuss whether the optical devices might not, in fact, represent instances of charlatanry.
recognized as charlatanry and primarily accused of using false medicine
Therefore hermetic knowledge such as alchemy, astrology or contact with ancestors was dismissed as charlatanry.
Hermes describes it as "a first-class soothsayer, an expert in arithmetic, astronomy, charlatanry, geometry, music and quackery" (2, 12-13), also emphasizing the brand name of Pythagoras' philosophical system, the "noblest of philosophies for sale": the notion of an ordered and harmonious universe and the doctrine of metempsychosis.
In linking creativity with entrepreneurship, not only does one give free advertising to a new species of charlatanry (business schools now offering programs in "creativity studies"), but it works to erase the line between commerce and culture that the latter requires if it is to survive.
He wrote: "I am sure it would be sensible to restrict as much as possible the work of these gentleman, who are capable of doing an immense amount of harm with what may very easily degenerate into charlatanry.
An insightful and inspirational leader, he wrote: "I am sure it would be sensible to restrict as much as possible the work of these gentleman, who are capable of doing an immense amount of harm with what may very easily degenerate into charlatanry.
Nietzsche, he says in a memorable phrase, helps us investigate "the charlatanry of reason," a necessary element in the investigation, and positing, of beginnings (1985,39).
He says he became disillusioned with the rise of what he characterized as a culture of charlatanry where anyone and everyone claimed some kind of psychic ability.
He comes to represent in the Christian tradition a debased form of magic, either unserious in its intent or partaking of outright charlatanry.