chasing

(redirected from chasings)

chase 1

 (chās)
v. chased, chas·ing, chas·es
v.tr.
1. To follow rapidly in order to catch or overtake; pursue: chased the thief.
2. To follow (game) in order to capture or kill; hunt: chase foxes.
3. To seek the favor or company of persistently: chased me until I agreed to a date.
4. To put to flight; drive: chased the dog away.
5. Baseball
a. To cause (an opposing pitcher) to be removed from a game by batting well.
b. To swing at and miss (a pitch, especially one out of the strike zone).
v.intr.
1. To go or follow in pursuit.
2. Informal To go hurriedly; rush: chased all over looking for us.
n.
1. The act of chasing; pursuit.
2.
a. The hunting of game: the thrill of the chase.
b. Something that is hunted or pursued; quarry.
3. Chiefly British
a. A privately owned, unenclosed game preserve.
b. The right to hunt or keep game on the land of others.
Idioms:
chase (one's) tail
To exert oneself vigorously but ineffectually.
give chase
To engage in pursuit of quarry: Police gave chase to the speeding car.

[Middle English chasen, to hunt, from Old French chacier, from Vulgar Latin *captiāre, from Latin captāre, to catch; see catch.]

chase 2

 (chās)
n. Printing
A rectangular steel or iron frame into which pages or columns of type are locked for printing or plate making.

[Perhaps from French châsse, case, reliquary, from Old French chasse, from Latin capsa.]

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chase3
floral chase motif on a lipstick case

chase 3

 (chās)
n.
1.
a. A groove cut in an object; a slot: the chase for the quarrel on a crossbow.
b. A trench or channel for drainpipes or wiring.
2. The part of a gun in front of the trunnions.
3. The cavity of a mold.
tr.v. chased, chas·ing, chas·es
1. To groove; indent.
2. To cut (the thread of a screw).
3. To decorate (metal) by engraving or embossing.

[Possibly from obsolete French chas, groove, enclosure, from Old French, from Latin capsa, box. V., variant of enchase.]

chasing

Ornamentation on metal by embossing (carving or stamping a design) or engraving (cutting lines into wood, metal, etc.).
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Yes, madame; the designs, the chasings -- all new patterns.
The Wolf complied, and while he was piping and the Kid was dancing, some hounds hearing the sound ran up and began chasing the Wolf.
He had brought it to London and when he was most depressed he had only to read a few pages to be transported into those chasing attics where Rodolphe and the rest of them danced and loved and sang.
It was like nigger- chasing, a service to perform for the gods whom he loved and who willed such chasing.
But in pursuit of those far mysteries we dream of, or in tormented chase of that demon phantom that, some time or other, swims before all human hearts; while chasing such over this round globe, they either lead us on in barren mazes or midway leave us whelmed.
His pursuers were after him at once, like two dogs chasing a hare.
We was scared through and through, and broke for the tobacker field and hid there, trembling so our clothes would hardly stay on; and just as we skipped in there, a couple of men went tearing by, and into the bunch they went, and in a second out jumps four men and took out up the road as tight as they could go, two chasing two.
Jip started to run after them, because chasing rats had always been his favorite game.
When sent to the forest Tip often climbed trees for birds' eggs or amused himself chasing the fleet white rabbits or fishing in the brooks with bent pins.
The natives who were chasing you, they found him and then the Englishman whom you met in Bekwando on his way inland, he rescued him.
Two snipe, playing and chasing one another, and only whistling, not crying, flew straight at the very heads of the sportsmen.
with a view of chasing away my melancholy, performed a thousand antics in the water before us.