chatelaine


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chat·e·laine

 (shăt′l-ān′)
n.
1.
a. The mistress of a castle.
b. The mistress of a large, fashionable household.
2. A clasp or chain worn at the waist for holding keys, a purse, a watch, or other small household items.

[French châtelaine, feminine of châtelain, chatelain, from Old French chastelain; see chatelain.]

chatelaine

(ˈʃætəˌleɪn; French ʃɑtlɛn)
n
1. (esp formerly) the mistress of a castle or fashionable household
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a chain or clasp worn at the waist by women in the 16th to the 19th centuries, with handkerchief, keys, etc, attached
3. (Jewellery) a decorative pendant worn on the lapel

chat•e•laine

(ˈʃæt lˌeɪn)

n.
1. the mistress of a castle or of a large and elegant household.
2. a hooklike clasp with chains for suspending small objects, as keys worn at the waist by women esp. in the 18th and 19th centuries.
[1835–45; < French châtelaine. See chatelain]

chatelaine

- The lady or mistress of a household.
See also related terms for lady.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chatelaine - the mistress of a chateau or large country housechatelaine - the mistress of a chateau or large country house
mistress - a woman master who directs the work of others
2.chatelaine - a chain formerly worn at the waist by women; for carrying a purse or bunch of keys etc.
chain - a series of (usually metal) rings or links fitted into one another to make a flexible ligament
Translations

chatelaine

[ˈʃætəleɪn] nchâtelaine f

chatelaine

n
(of castle, = housekeeper) → Schlossverwalterin f; (= owner)Schlossherrin f
(old) Gürtel, an dem ein Schlüsselbund getragen wird
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References in classic literature ?
Lady Arabella was cold-blooded, and she was prepared to go through all that might be necessary of indifference, and even insult, to become chatelaine of Castra Regis.
She was building a castle in air -- a wondrous mansion whose sunlit courts and stately halls were steeped in Araby's perfume, and where she reigned queen and chatelaine. She frowned as she saw Gilbert coming through the orchard.
"My sweet bird," said Sir Nigel, "I am right loth to part from you, but we are now at the fringe of the forest, and it is not right that I should take the chatelaine too far from her trust."
Even if he should not be so, he will not come amiss, since, in the first place, he has his pension, and, in the second place, he will be content to live in a back room; whereas I shall be Madame General, and get into a good circle of society" (she was always thinking of this) "and become a Russian chatelaine. Yes, I shall have a mansion of my own, and peasants, and a million of money at my back."
Daisy found it impossible to keep her eyes off her `pitty aunty', but attached herself like a lap dog to the wonderful chatelaine full of delightful charms.
Wilson and Flem-Ath dispute Chatelaine's rather bizarre conclusion but swallow his assertion wholesale and use it as evidence for an advanced Atlantean civilisation that was wiped out by a natural disaster - the great flood.
Poulton's story begins in 1982 when Chatelaine approached her with an offer to pick up the tab if she would promise to lose 65 pounds in six months and write about it.
Proposals to revamp Coughton village, a conservation area, have been put forward by Mrs Clare McLaren-Throckmorton, the chatelaine of historic Coughton Court, a 16th century country house with connections to the Gunpowder Plot.
Mrs Clare McLaren-Throckmorton, the chatelaine of Coughton Court, near Alcester, accused the trust of endangering the aims of its founders, which includes the preservation of a thriving rural heritage.
She edited Chatelaine magazine from 1957 to 1977, publishing a women's journal so far ahead of its time, she says, that she rejected a manuscript excerpt from Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique because she believed Chatelaine had already amply covered all the issues it addressed.
She has since finished second in both her subsequent races behind Murchan Tyne at Leicester and La Chatelaine at Epsom and she looks to be on a winning mark in the Northern Racing Handicap.
Old Chatelaine magazines are scattered around the waiting area, along with the day's Journal de Montreal and pamphlets on alternative medicine.