chaunt


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chaunt

 (chônt, chänt)
n. & v. Archaic
Variant of chant.

chaunt

(tʃɔːnt)
n, vb
a less common variant of chant
ˈchaunter n

chant

(tʃænt, tʃɑnt)

n.
1. a short, simple melody, esp. the monodic intonation of plainsong.
2. a psalm, canticle, or the like, chanted or for chanting.
3. a song; singing: the chant of a bird.
4. a phrase, slogan, or the like, repeated rhythmically and insistently, as by a crowd.
v.t.
5. to sing to a chant, or in the manner of a chant, esp. in a church service.
6. to repeat (a phrase, slogan, etc.) rhythmically and insistently.
v.i.
7. to utter a chant.
[1350–1400; (v.) Middle English < Middle French chanter < Latin cantāre, frequentative of canere to sing; (n.) < French chant, Old French < Latin cantus; see canto]
chant′a•ble, adj.
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References in classic literature ?
Up to a hill anon his steps he reared, From whose high top to ken the prospect round, If cottage were in view, sheep-cote, or herd; But cottage, herd, or sheep-cote, none he saw-- Only in a bottom saw a pleasant grove, With chaunt of tuneful birds resounding loud.
When the bachelor had given her in connection with almost every tomb and flat grave-stone some history of its own, he took her down into the old crypt, now a mere dull vault, and showed her how it had been lighted up in the time of the monks, and how, amid lamps depending from the roof, and swinging censers exhaling scented odours, and habits glittering with gold and silver, and pictures, and precious stuffs, and jewels all flashing and glistening through the low arches, the chaunt of aged voices had been many a time heard there, at midnight, in old days, while hooded figures knelt and prayed around, and told their rosaries of beads.
Bucket receives the harmonious impeachment so modestly, confessing how that he did once chaunt a little, for the expression of the feelings of his own bosom, and with no presumptuous idea of entertaining his friends, that he is asked to sing.
We do not with sufficient plainness or sufficient profoundness address ourselves to life, nor dare we chaunt our own times and social circumstance.
It has a ghostly sound too, lingering within the altar; where it seems to chaunt, in its wild way, of Wrong and Murder done, and false Gods worshipped, in defiance of the Tables of the Law, which look so fair and smooth, but are so flawed and broken.
He was an ugly priest by torchlight; of a lowering aspect, with an overhanging brow; and as his eyes met those of Mr Dorrit, looking bareheaded out of the carriage, his lips, moving as they chaunted, seemed to threaten that important traveller; likewise the action of his hand, which was in fact his manner of returning the traveller's salutation, seemed to come in aid of that menace.
The nine muses also came and lifted up their sweet voices in lament--calling and answering one another; there was not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Days and nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but on the eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheep with many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you.
In doing so the court rejected the materiality analyses lower courts had used after the Supreme Courts holding in Chaunt v.
I never saw any more striking scenes than those forest screens & terrible crags, all lonely lonely lonely: paths through them leading to hermitages where these dead men abide,--or to the immense monasteries where many hundred of these living corpses chaunt prayers nightly & daily: the blue sea dark dark against the hard iron rocks below The living corpses of the monasteries 'chaunt prayers', filling the scene with an eerie music.
I would mock thy chaunt anew; But I cannot mimick it; Not a whit of thy tuwhoo, Thee to woo to thy tuwhit, Thee to woo to thy tuwhit, With a lengthened loud halloo, Tuwhoo, tuwhit, tuwhit, tuwhoo-o-o.
is a chaunt in the recitation both of Coleridge and Wordsworth, which
He describes his musical communion: "I entered with soothing awe the lighted chancel, and listened to the solemn religious chaunt, which spoke peace and hope to the unhappy.