chayote


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cha·yo·te

 (chä-yō′tā, -tĕ)
n.
1. A tropical American perennial vine (Sechium edule) having tuberous roots and cultivated for its green, pear-shaped fruit.
2. The fruit of this plant, eaten as a vegetable. In both senses also called christophine; also called regionally mirliton.

[Spanish, from Nahuatl chayohtli.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chayote

(tʃɑːˈjəʊteɪ; tʃaɪˈəʊtɪ)
n
1. (Plants) a tropical American cucurbitaceous climbing plant, Sechium edule, that has edible pear-shaped fruit enclosing a single enormous seed
2. (Cookery) the fruit of this plant, which is cooked and eaten as a vegetable
[from Spanish, from Nahuatl chayotli]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
chayotte
References in periodicals archive ?
Our soup plates were served with a stack of banana heart, chayote, fennel, and a piece of giant grouper topped with lemongrass foam.
They also incorporated local ingredients (banana heart, chayote, moringa) and flavors (dalandan, calamansi, mango) in most of the dishes.
There's also something for vegans and vegetarians with a separate menu just for them featuring the likes of jackfruit and peanut bang bang salad with chayote and mouli (both vegetables), Chinese leaf, crispy wonton, peanuts and coriander.
The superfood chayote, or chocho, is often still an unknown option but with a 76-percent growth in chayote recipe searches, Pinterest sees the unique gourd option as trend.
Session Groceries is selling vegetables such as tomato, cauliflower, bell pepper, and chayote for as low as P35 pesos.
Chefs note: If kohlrabi or watermelon radishes are unavailable, substitute with an equal amount of prepared broccoli slaw mix, jicama, or chayote squash.
Recently, I noticed that the produce sections of my local supermarket locations now feature chayote, no-pales, tomatillos, and at least half a dozen kinds of fresh chili peppers.