cheap money


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Related to cheap money: fiat money, Dear money
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Noun1.cheap money - credit available at low rates of interest
credit - money available for a client to borrow
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References in periodicals archive ?
'So now, we are studying how we can use this cheap money for overcoming our financial problems,' he told a press conference after opening the World Tourism Conference (WTC) 2019.
The bank's head criticised plans to print more money saying there is already enough cheap money available.
We can understand if an ignorant person who is looking for cheap money goes to vandalise such a critical infrastructure, but it's more frustrating when the arms of government do the same thing just because they feel it's the only way to squeeze you to part with money they've demanded from you.'
They don't talk about projects but dish out cheap money.'
Stocks have rallied this week, helped by promises of patience from the Federal Reserve, the ECB mulling more cheap money, and progress in trade talks between Washington and Beijing.
With that policy now being unwound, the era of 'cheap money' is over, and funds are trekking back to developed nations as yields on the less risky dollar-denominated investments rise once more.
If 'cheap' money is creating excessive demand and higher prices, then cheap money must be taken away.
AT the heart of this week's stock market mayhem is ending an era of cheap money.
Deutsche Bank chief executive John Cryan has called on the European Central Bank to change course on providing cheap money, warning he sees price bubbles in stocks, bonds and property.
And a decade after this economic heart attack we are still on the life-support of ultra cheap money.
By Lukman Otunuga, Research Analyst at FXTM The well-orchestrated hawkish remarks by a chorus of central bank heavyweights this week have punished global stocks with speculation mounting over whether the era of cheap money is soon coming to an end.
The policy of seemingly endless supplies of cheap money may well be judged a success in bringing economies back to life (time will tell), but the feeding frenzy for borrowing encouraged by near-zero rates has brought us close to the brink of another crisis.