checkoff


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check·off

 (chĕk′ôf′, -ŏf′)
n.
Collection of dues from members of a union by authorized deduction from their wages.

check•off

(ˈtʃɛkˌɔf, -ˌɒf)

n.
1. the collection of union dues by employers through deductions from wages.
2. a voluntary contribution from one's income tax, as for a political campaign fund.
[1910–15]
References in periodicals archive ?
Relative to the oldest producers (65+), the youngest producers in the sample are more supportive of the checkoff program and are also significantly more likely to support an increase in checkoff-funded advertising levels.
Most everyone is familiar with advertisements promoting cattle consumption in American households with the imperative that "beef" is "what's for dinner." These commercials and others like it are funded by the beef checkoff, a mandatory one dollar fee assessed every time that a cow is sold in the United States.
The OCPF last month reviewed a complaint it received alleging that the police officials union was requiring union members to contribute to the Worcester Police Officials PAC through a negative checkoff.
red meat industry and is funded by USDA, exporting companies, and the beef, pork, corn and soybean checkoff programs.
Grains Council is intensifying its sorghum marketing efforts as a result of United Sorghum Checkoff Program funding.
Arkansas Soybean Association is a governmental agency, not a private organization, as was incorrectly reported in an article on farmer checkoff funds that appeared in the Aug.
"One thing we agreed on was how much he loved the dollar checkoff," recalled Nick Klonoski, a veteran campaign worker.
NMPF has also issued a statement applauding USDA's decision to apply the dairy promotion checkoff to imported dairy products, 25 years after the national 15-cent checkoff was first applied to U.S.-produced milk.
The United Sorghum Checkoff Program (USCP) has selected Minneapolis- based Broadhead + Co to launch its domestic demand building campaign.
Meanwhile, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has reported that the American Egg Board hatched an illegal plan to fight the proposed law with a $3 million so-called "general consumer education" campaign funded by mandatory fees collected from egg producers, also known as commodity checkoff "taxes." By law, these funds--more than $20 million a year for the egg industry--can only be used for research, education and marketing.
The 3-year, $2.9 million project is being funded through the United Soybean Board's soybean checkoff program.
Much of Purdue's research into the uses of soybeans is funded through a master agreement with the Indiana Soybean Alliance using soybean checkoff dollars.