carcinogen

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car·cin·o·gen

 (kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kär′sə-nə-jĕn′)
n.
A cancer-causing substance or agent.

car′ci·no·gen′e·sis (kär′sə-nə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs) n.
car′cin·o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
car′ci·no·ge·nic′i·ty (-jə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carcinogen

(kɑːˈsɪnədʒən; ˈkɑːsɪnəˌdʒɛn)
n
(Pathology) pathol any substance that produces cancer
[C20: from Greek karkinos cancer + -gen]
ˌcarcinoˈgenic adj
ˌcarcinogenˈicity n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•cin•o•gen

(kɑrˈsɪn ə dʒən)

n.
any substance or agent that tends to produce a cancer.
[1935–40; carcino (ma) + -gen]
car`cin•o•gen•ic (-sə nəˈdʒɛn ɪk) adj.
car`ci•no•ge•nic′i•ty (-dʒəˈnɪs ɪ ti) n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·cin·o·gen

(kär-sĭn′ə-jən)
A substance or agent that can cause cancer. Asbestos and tobacco products are examples of carcinogens.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carcinogen

any natural or artificial substance that can produce or trigger cancer, as arsenic, asbestos, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet rays, x rays, and many derivatives of coal tar. — carcinogenic, adj.
See also: Cancer
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

carcinogen

Any cancer-causing agent.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carcinogen - any substance that produces cancercarcinogen - any substance that produces cancer  
substance - a particular kind or species of matter with uniform properties; "shigella is one of the most toxic substances known to man"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

carcinogen

[kɑːˈsɪnədʒen] Ncarcinógeno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

carcinogen

[kɑːrˈsɪnədʒən] nsubstance f cancérigène
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

carcinogen

nKrebserreger m, → Karzinogen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

carcinogen

[kɑːˈsɪnədʒən] n (Med) → cancerogeno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

car·cin·o·gen

n. carcinógeno, cualquier sustancia que puede producir cáncer.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carcinogen

n carcinógeno, cancerígeno, sustancia que causa cáncer
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They then used that technique to map all damage caused by the major chemical carcinogen -- benzo[α]pyrene.
Most protein candidates were revealed for the first time to be involved in skin cell damage from chemical carcinogen. This work might provide new insight into the understanding of risk assessment and toxicological mechanism of skin diseases caused by chemical carcinogens.
In the present study we sought to investigate the induction of mammary tumour in female Wistar rats using MNU, a chemical carcinogen and evaluation of MMP activities and histopathological changes.
The research has found that cooking red meat at high temperatures may produce a potent chemical carcinogen, which triggers the cancer.
The story of tobacco shows us that when an exposure to a chemical carcinogen is eliminated, lives are saved.
Melanomas have been induced in animal studies after exposure to intense ultraviolet light, or to a chemical carcinogen followed by ultraviolet light.
The compound also decreased the incidence of breast cancers in rats that had been injected with a chemical carcinogen. Albany Med cautioned that the results are preliminary, but the findings were significant enough to be accepted for presentation Nov.
According to the Web site plastics mythbuster.org, compiled by the American Plastics Council (APC), Arlington, Va., there is no credence to the rumor that reusing PET water bottles can cause a harmful chemical carcinogen (cited in the myth as diethylhydroxylamine, or DEHA) in the plastic to leach over time.
Furthermore, the risk associated with exposure to a chemical carcinogen is critically dependent on the level of exposure: the dose makes the poison, in an imperfect effort to deal with this, Proposition 65 includes an exception whereby the cancer warning is not needed if "the exposure poses no significant risk assuming lifetime exposure at the level in question." Proposition 65 establishes another important exemption whereby warnings are not required for chemical substances that occur naturally in food.
For example, the mechanism by which a chemical carcinogen interacts with DNA is carefully explained with the extensive use of diagrams.
he mice are typically given HCC either by exposure to a chemical carcinogen, known as DEN, when they are two weeks old, or by exposure to that same carcinogen at three months of age followed by the tumor-promoting chemical phenobarbitol.
One month later, the scientists injected the animals with a chemical carcinogen. Cancer developed in 93 percent of the rats on the normal diet but in only half of those given the CLA-enriched diet.