stimulus

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stim·u·lus

 (stĭm′yə-ləs)
n. pl. stim·u·li (-lī′)
1. Something causing or regarded as causing a response.
2. An agent, action, or condition that elicits or accelerates a physiological or psychological activity or response.
3.
a. Something that incites or rouses to action; an incentive: "Works which were in themselves poor have often proved a stimulus to the imagination" (W.H. Auden).
b. Government spending designed to generate or increase economic activity.

[Latin, goad.]

stimulus

(ˈstɪmjʊləs)
n, pl -li (-ˌlaɪ; -ˌliː)
1. something that stimulates or acts as an incentive
2. (Physiology) any drug, agent, electrical impulse, or other factor able to cause a response in an organism
3. (Psychology) an object or event that is apprehended by the senses
4. (Pharmacology) med a former name for stimulant
[C17: from Latin: a cattle goad]

stim•u•lus

(ˈstɪm yə ləs)

n., pl. -li (-ˌlaɪ)
1. something that incites or quickens action, feeling, thought, etc.
2. something that excites an organism or part to functional activity.
[1605–15; < Latin: a goad, stimulus]

stim·u·lus

(stĭm′yə-ləs)
Plural stimuli (stĭm′yə-lī′)
Something that causes a response in a body part or organism. A stimulus may be internal or external. Sense organs, such as the ear, and sensory receptors, such as those in the skin, are sensitive to external stimuli such as sound and touch.

stimulus

Any change that evokes a response from an organism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stimulus - any stimulating information or eventstimulus - any stimulating information or event; acts to arouse action
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
elicitation, evocation, induction - stimulation that calls up (draws forth) a particular class of behaviors; "the elicitation of his testimony was not easy"
kick - the sudden stimulation provided by strong drink (or certain drugs); "a sidecar is a smooth drink but it has a powerful kick"
turn-on - something causing excitement or stimulating interest
negative stimulation, turnoff - something causing antagonism or loss of interest
conditioned stimulus - the stimulus that is the occasion for a conditioned response
reinforcer, reinforcing stimulus, reinforcement - (psychology) a stimulus that strengthens or weakens the behavior that produced it
discriminative stimulus, cue - a stimulus that provides information about what to do
positive stimulus - a stimulus with desirable consequences
negative stimulus - a stimulus with undesirable consequences

stimulus

noun incentive, spur, encouragement, impetus, provocation, inducement, goad, incitement, fillip, shot in the arm (informal), clarion call, geeing-up Falling interest rates could be a stimulus to the economy.

stimulus

noun
1. Something that causes and encourages a given response:
2. Something that incites especially a violent response:
Translations
باعِث، دافِعمُثير، حافِز
hnací sílapodnět
motivationstimulus
inger
áreiti, ertingörvun, hvatning; drifkraftur
pamudinājumsstimuls
hnacia sila

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] N (stimuli (pl)) [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ]estímulo m, incentivo m

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] [stimuli] [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ] (pl) n
(= encouragement) → stimulant m
(PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY)stimulus m
(BIOLOGY)stimulus m

stimulus

n pl <stimuli> → Anreiz m, → Ansporn m; (= inspiration)Anregung f, → Stimulus m; (Physiol) → Reiz m; (Psych) → Stimulus m; it gave the trade new stimulusdas hat dem Handel neuen Aufschwung gegeben

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] n (stimuli (pl)) [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ]stimolo
it gave trade a new stimulus → ha dato un nuovo impulso al commercio
under the stimulus of → stimolato/a da

stimulus

(ˈstimjuləs) plural ˈstimuli (-liː) noun
1. something that causes a reaction in a living thing. Light is the stimulus that causes a flower to open.
2. something that rouses or encourages a person etc to action or greater effort. Many people think that children need the stimulus of competition to make them work better in school.

stim·u·lus

n. estímulo, cualquier agente o factor que produce una reacción;
conditioned ______ condicionado;
subliminal ______ sublimado.

stimulus

n (pl -li) estímulo
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the acetic acid writhing test results wherein the peripheral analgesic effect was evaluated by measuring the writhing numbers of mice after chemical stimulus, the analgesic effects of all the NSAIDs were highly significant (p<0.001).
Synpromics has employed its technology to develop new synthetic inducible/repressible cell-systems that are driven by non-toxic physiological or chemical stimulus, making them ideal for improving productivity and minimizing costs during bioproduction.
Chemotaxis is the directional movement of cells in response to a chemical stimulus and is an essential component of immune responses, tumor metastasis, wound healing, and blood vessel formation.
In transduction, the mechanical or chemical stimulus is converted into electrical energy by sensory receptors.
Two-way repeated measures ANOVA was also used to analyze differences in the responses of shrimp to food, Gly, and maltose before and after aesthetasc ablation, separately for each chemical stimulus (fixed factor: stimuli [2 levels]; repeated measures factor: ablation [2 levels]).
This is related to a chemical stimulus in the form of citric acid that is found in pineapple, where the acid is the most powerful stimulus in increasing the secretion saliva (16) and to chewing pineapple as a mekanis stimulus.
Function enrichment analysis showed that the module 1 genes were closely related to sensory perception of smell, sensory perception of chemical stimulus related biological process, olfactory receptor activity related MF, and olfactory transduction pathway.
In writhing test, a noxious chemical stimulus (acetic acid) administered intra- peritoneally resulted in abdominal constriction [18].
The study has clinical relevance concerning the field of mechanotransduction--the study of how a mechanical force gets changed into a chemical stimulus inside the body.

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