chemise


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che·mise

 (shə-mēz′)
n.
1. A woman's loose, shirtlike undergarment.
2. A loosely fitting dress that hangs straight; a shift.

[Middle English, from Old French, shirt, from Late Latin camisia, probably ultimately (perhaps via Gaulish) of Germanic origin; akin to German Hemd, shirt.]

chemise

(ʃəˈmiːz)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) an unwaisted loose-fitting dress hanging straight from the shoulders
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a loose shirtlike undergarment
Also called: shift
[C14: from Old French: shirt, from Late Latin camisa, perhaps of Celtic origin]

che•mise

(ʃəˈmiz)

n.
1. a woman's loose-fitting, shirtlike or sliplike undergarment; shift.
2. a dress designed to hang straight from the shoulders without fitting at the waist.
[1200–50; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French: shirt < Late Latin camīsa linen undergarment, shirt]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chemise - a woman's sleeveless undergarmentchemise - a woman's sleeveless undergarment  
shoulder strap, strap - a band that goes over the shoulder and supports a garment or bag
undergarment, unmentionable - a garment worn under other garments
2.chemise - a loose-fitting dress hanging straight from the shoulders without a waist
dress, frock - a one-piece garment for a woman; has skirt and bodice
Translations

chemise

[ʃəˈmiːz] Nblusa f camisera

chemise

[ʃəˈmiːz] n (= undergarment) → chemise f

chemise

nUnterkleid nt
References in classic literature ?
Timokhin, kept awake by the pain in his wounded leg, gazed with wide-open eyes at this strange apparition of a girl in a white chemise, dressing jacket, and nightcap.
She took them in her little chemise, as she had no bathing suit, and afterwards her nurse dressed her in the cabin of a customs officer, which was used for that purpose by other bathers.
Then the aged stranger, who had not uttered one word since his arrival, arose from his seat and deliberately laid off his outer clothing, looking as angular in his flannels as the late Signorina Festorazzi, an Irish woman, six feet in height, and weighing fifty- six pounds, who used to exhibit herself in her chemise to the people of San Francisco.
The Doctor immediately repaired to his wardrobe, and soon returned with a black dress coat, made in Jennings' best manner, a pair of sky-blue plaid pantaloons with straps, a pink gingham chemise, a flapped vest of brocade, a white sack overcoat, a walking cane with a hook, a hat with no brim, patent-leather boots, straw-colored kid gloves, an eye-glass, a pair of whiskers, and a waterfall cravat.
Beside him stood a girl of nine years old, tall and thin, wearing a thin and ragged chemise with an ancient cashmere pelisse flung over her bare shoulders, long outgrown and barely reaching her knees.
She made little corset covers and chemises of fine but fairly inexpensive lawns, and, with simple flowered designs and perfect laundering, her nightgowns were always sweetly fresh and dainty.
"I suppose, Miss Temple, the thread I bought at Lowton will do; it struck me that it would be just of the quality for the calico chemises, and I sorted the needles to match.
The This Morning presenter, 37, posed in a sexy black lacy chemise on Instagram, looking gorgeous as she tossed back her long blonde hair with one hand.
Jazzy's colourful shades found a true companion in N by Natalie's off-shoulder, deconstructed chemise. Meanwhile, the dramatic cat-eye shades were found to be the perfect match to a black ruffled blouse.
four PS40 under 1 one Lace and satin teddy, PS35, Topshop two Satin floral lounge suit, PS24.99, New Look 3 three Cami short set, PS14, F&F at Tesco four Satin chemise, PS30, Figleaves SILKY SLEEPWEAR Add a touch of glam to bedtime and feel every inch the Hollywood heroine.
Paul Getty Trust can do, Marie-Antoinette takes us on location to experience the queen's rarefied world: her living quarters, gardens, carriages, furniture, gowns, tableware, childhood toys, and, yes, even the humble cotton chemise she was wearing when she lost her head.