chemoreceptor


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che·mo·re·cep·tor

 (kē′mō-rĭ-sĕp′tər, kĕm′ō-)
n.
A sensory nerve cell or sense organ, as of smell or taste, that responds to chemical stimuli.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chemoreceptor

(ˌkɛməʊrɪˈsɛptə) or

chemoceptor

n
(Physiology) a sensory receptor in a biological cell membrane to which an external molecule binds to generate a smell or taste sensation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

che•mo•re•cep•tor

(ˌki moʊ rɪˈsɛp tər, ˌkɛm oʊ-)

n.
a receptor stimulated by chemical means.
[1905–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

chemoreceptor

A sensory organ that responds to a chemical stimulus. Chemoreceptors give us our senses of taste and smell.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chemoreceptor - a sensory receptor that responds to chemical stimuli
sense organ, sensory receptor, receptor - an organ having nerve endings (in the skin or viscera or eye or ear or nose or mouth) that respond to stimulation
gustatory organ, taste bud, tastebud - an oval sensory end organ on the surface of the tongue
carotid body - a chemoreceptor located near the bifurcations of the carotid arteries; monitors oxygen content of the blood and helps control respiration
nose, olfactory organ - the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract; the prominent part of the face of man or other mammals; "he has a cold in the nose"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

che·mo·re·cep·tor

, chemoceptor
n. quimiorreceptor-a, célula suceptible a cambios químicos o que puede ser afectada por éstos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
CBTs are slowly growing tumors that arise from chemoreceptor tissue in carotid bifurcation.
The chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ) located in the postrema surface of the brain also can stimulate the vomiting center indirectly.
I do not consider oxygen as a substrate for enzymes, sensing proteins, mitochondria, or chemoreceptor cells.
Although being quite different from clinical hypoxia, it is well known that one of the first responses to hypobaric hypoxia is increased heart rate as a result of carotid and aortic chemoreceptor stimulation (1).
These drugs have multiple mechanisms of benefit, including acting on the midbrain to reduce the sensation of shortness of breath, decreasing oxygen consumption by reducing muscle activity, suppressing cough, reducing chemoreceptor sensitivity to carbon dioxide, and decreasing cardiac preload and sympathetic tone.
They also exhibit an increased respiratory activity, which is due to the high chemoreceptor activity in this animal strain.
Scientists from the US, Argentina, Israel, India, and Europe discuss electron cryptomography and its application to bacterial chemoreceptor arrays, designing symmetric protein nanomaterials, weighted ensemble simulation, eukaryotic transcription initiation machinery, biophysical models of protein evolution, rate constants and mechanisms of protein-ligand binding, the integration of bacterial small RNAs in regulatory networks, recognition of client proteins by the proteasome, chemokine receptor structures and function, progress in human Tetrahymena telomerase structure determination, the theory and modeling of RNA structure and interactions with metal ions and small molecules, and reconstructing ancient proteins to understand the causes of structure and function.
Nausea is mediated by neural pathways, whereas vomiting is initiated and coordinated by the vomiting center and the Chemoreceptor Trigger Zone (CTZ).
The same structure also serves as a contact chemoreceptor (Thurm et al., 1998b; reviewed by Kass-Simon and Scappaticci, 2002).
Ventilation continues to be elevated with acclimatization and may be an indication of increased chemoreceptor sensitivity to blood gas changes occurring at altitude.
In the 1950s, regions of the brain most involved in emesis--the vomiting centre and chemoreceptor trigger zone--and a key neurotransmitter, dopamine, were isolated.