chemosynthesis


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che·mo·syn·the·sis

 (kē′mō-sĭn′thĭ-sĭs, kĕm′ō-)
n.
The synthesis of organic compounds by certain bacteria, especially in deep-sea hydrothermal vents, using energy obtained from the chemical oxidation of simple inorganic compounds. Chemosynthesis is thought to have been used by the first forms of life on Earth.

che′mo·syn·thet′ic (-sĭn-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
che′mo·syn·thet′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chemosynthesis

(ˌkɛməʊˈsɪnθɪsɪs)
n
(Biochemistry) the formation of organic material by certain bacteria using energy derived from simple chemical reactions
chemosynthetic adj
ˌchemosynˈthetically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

che•mo•syn•the•sis

(ˌki moʊˈsɪn θə sɪs, ˌkɛm oʊ-)

n.
the synthesis of organic compounds within an organism, with chemical reactions providing the energy source.
[1900–05]
che`mo•syn•thet′ic (-ˈθɛt ɪk) adj.
che`mo•syn•thet′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

che·mo·syn·the·sis

(kē′mō-sĭn′thĭ-sĭs)
The formation of organic compounds using the energy released from chemical reactions instead of the energy of sunlight. Bacteria living in deep, dark areas of the ocean are able to survive by chemosynthesis. They use energy derived from the oxidation of inorganic chemicals, such as sulfur from deep volcanic vents, to make their food. Compare photosynthesis.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chemosynthesis - synthesis of carbohydrate from carbon dioxide and water; limited to certain bacteria and fungi
synthesis - the process of producing a chemical compound (usually by the union of simpler chemical compounds)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrothermal vent ecosystems are universally driven by chemosynthesis; in absence of sunlight, primary productivity is drawn from chemoautotrophic microbes that derive energy from the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide, methane, or a variety of other inorganic reducing agents (Stewart et al., 2005).
Nucleic acid drugs are medicines with a basic structure consisting of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or chemical modified nucleic acids, and are manufactured via chemosynthesis similar to small molecule drugs.
Proteobacteria sulfide-oxidative mandatory endosymbiotics also collaborates with these bivalves alimentation, contributing with organic compounds generated from chemosynthesis (LePennec et al., 1988).
Chemosynthesis. Many methods exist for preparing HA powder, such as wet and dry methods.
Ackert Jr., "The Role of Microbes in Agriculture: Sergei Vinogradskii's Discovery and Investigation of Chemosynthesis, 1880-1910," Journal of the History of Biology 39, 2 (2006): 373-406; and Nikolai Krementsov, International Science between the World Wars: 7be Case of Genetics (London: Routledge, 2004).
"Bacteria are both consumers and producers and are the primary producers in chemosynthesis, so they will influence the chemical environment, which allows other forms of life to establish."
Rather than photosynthesis, these Epsilonproteobacteria survive using chemosynthesis: To build their bodies, they extract energy from inorganic chemicals that leach out of rocks below the seafloor and into the vent fluid.
Urban Blooms and Chemosynthesis integrate found objects with slip cast and unfired slip applications, alluding to consumerism, waste, and ecological issues.
Due to chemosynthesis, this particular bacterium is able to survive in such extreme conditions in the vents.
The earliest practitioners likely used H2S rather than [H.sub.2]O, and some of them probably practiced chemosynthesis, a similar (yet heterotrophic) process that utilizes the chemical energy of inorganic compounds and is thus not dependent on solar energy.