chert

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chert

 (chûrt)
n.
1. A variety of silica that contains microcrystalline quartz.
2. A siliceous rock of chalcedonic or opaline silica occurring in limestone.

[Origin unknown.]

chert′y adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chert

(tʃɜːt)
n
(Minerals) a microcrystalline form of silica usually occurring as bands or layers of pebbles in sedimentary rock. Formula: SiO2. Varieties include flint, lyddite (Lydian stone). Also called: hornstone
[C17: of obscure origin]
ˈcherty adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chert

(tʃɜrt)

n.
a compact rock consisting essentially of microcrystalline quartz.
[1670–80; orig. uncertain]
chert′y, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

chert

(chûrt)
A hard, brittle, reddish-brown to green sedimentary rock consisting of very small crystals of quartz.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chert

A type of sedimentary rock made up of of tiny quartz crystals.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chert - variety of silica containing microcrystalline quartz
taconite - a variety of chert containing magnetite and hematite; mined as a low-grade iron ore
silica, silicon dioxide, silicon oxide - a white or colorless vitreous insoluble solid (SiO2); various forms occur widely in the earth's crust as quartz or cristobalite or tridymite or lechatelierite
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

chert

n (Min) → Kieselschiefer m, → Feuerstein m, → Hornstein m; (Build) → Gneiszuschlag(stoff) &, Feingranitzuschlag m (für Sichtbeton)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Alt's recent drilling confirmed broad zones of gold mineralisation in a package of ultramafic and mafic schists, sulphidic shales, and cherts including drillhole SBRC006, which returned 80 metres at 1.49g/t Au (Figure 2).
This is evidenced by the Polish varieties of flint and Moravian cherts. class="article-published 10.
For comparison, the fresh surrounding rocks, including the black shales and green cherts, were also sampled, crushed, and analyzed.
Two periods of searing-hot hydrothermal activity had cooked both the seafloor cherts and the surface glacial sediments.
Most are a variety of cryptocrystalline silicates, divided into fibrous chalcedony, granular cherts, and microcrystalline silicates (MCS), distinguished by coarser grains visible under a hand lens.
In this regard, he suggested construction of a railway that would link the Balajan deposit of cherts and the Balachichkana deposit of iron ore.
Evolving from his dissertation work on Nichigan Pleistocene sands and gravels, he became interested in the properties of cherts. In 1964, the Ohio Highway Dept, in cooperation with the U.S.
The rocks exposed at the Hale Creek mine are typical of the Franciscan-Knoxville group of late Jurassic age and consist of sandstones, shales, cherts, greenstones and graywackes.
Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in nodular and bedded cherts. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 40, pp.
Alt's recent ten hole RC program reported here has confirmed the historical results intercepting broad zones of low-level gold in a series of ultramafic and mafic schists with sulphidic shales and cherts. Drillhole SBRC006, which returned 80 metres at 1.49g/t Au (Figure 2 in link below), indicates significant potential, and with the hole ending in low-grade gold mineralisation in massive sulphides selected samples have been sent for base metal assaying.
While ED-XRF has traditionally been used for sourcing obsidian and other volcanic rocks (Shackley, 2011b), recent studies show that it is also a useful method for establishing the geochemical signatures of cherts (e.g., Gauthier and Burke, 2012; this study), indicating that ED-XRF has the potential to be a versatile archaeological fingerprinting technique for a variety of raw materials.